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Wednesday, April 22
 

8:00am

Acknowledgements
The Undergraduate Research Program would like to give a speical thanks to everyone who assisted in the organizing and planning of the 2015 Spring Symposium.

Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:00am - 8:00am
UNC Asheville

8:00am

Extended Acknowledgements
Wilma Sherrill Center Staff, Highsmith Union Staff, UNCA Foundation

Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:00am - 8:00am
UNC Asheville

8:00am

Mission Statement
The mission of the UNC Asheville Undergraduate Research Program is to provide students with a wide variety of research, scholarly and creative opportunities that support and supplement other education activities. The Program encourages students and faculty mentors to engage in the complete active research process, including design and implementation of projects and dissemination of results.

Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:00am - 8:00am
UNC Asheville

8:00am

Program Committee Members
Mark Harvey Director Undergraduate Research Program, Mila Lemaster Program Coordinator, Undergraduate Research Program, Jasmine Riazati Office Assistant Undergradutate Research Program, Ed Katz Associate Provost and University Dean, Office of the Provost, Aaron Dahlstrom Social Media & Communications Manager

Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:00am - 8:00am
UNC Asheville

8:00am

UNC Asheville Foundation Inc.
For their continued support to the Undergraduate Research Program

Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:00am - 8:00am
UNC Asheville

8:00am

Sexual Dimorphism in Nectar-feeding bats (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae)
This study examined sexual dimorphism in 19 species of nectar feeding bats of the family Phyllostomidae, representing four subfamiles Glossophaginae, Brachyphyllinae, Phyllonycterinae and Lonchophyllinae subfamilies. Most nectar feeding bats have elongated muzzles and tongues, and reduced post-canine teeth, which are specializations for this diet. However, many have large canine teeth, despite the lack of hard food items in their diet. Across mammals, sexually dimorphic traits are often related to various mating strategies. This study used measurements of forearm length, skull size, and canine tooth size, taken from 892 individuals in museums to determine patterns of sexual dimorphism in these bats. Of the 19 species, only three were monomorphic in all three variables (skull size, canine size, and forearm length). The remaining 15 species exhibited some degree of sexual dimorphism in one or two of the measurements, but no species showed dimorphism across all three traits. There were three instances where the forearms of females were significantly longer than those of the males, and two different instances, where females had significantly larger skulls than males. In all 13 species with significant size differences in canines, the larger canines were found on the males. Only 3 species had males that were significantly larger in both skull size and canine tooth size. The smaller of the species generally did not show dimorphism in the size of their canines, while canine dimorphism was common in larger bats. These results will be analyzed in a phylogenetic and behavioral context.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:00am - 8:20am
014 Zeis Hall

8:00am

Synthesis of Substituted Indole Chalcones
Combretastatin A-4, isolated from the South African bush willow, is known to disrupt vascular function by binding readily to the colchicine site of β-tubulin. Chalcones, with structural features similar to Combretastatin A-4, are also known to inhibit tubulin polymerization by disrupting formation or functionality of its microtubules. Heterocyclic chalcone derivatives have been synthesized in the literature and many act as tubulin binding agents or show significant bioactivity. This research examines the synthesis of indole chalcone and α-halo substituted indole chalcone analogs of Combretastatin A-4 utilizing the Hemetsberger-Knittel indole methodology. The indole aldehyde was combined with a substituted acetophenone under Aldol and Claisen-Schmidt condensation conditions. Although the actual indole chalcone product is unconfirmed through spectroscopic analysis, the Claisen-Schmidt reaction provided the best results. Synthesis of the α-halo indole chalcones utilized the same reaction conditions with an α-halo-3,4,5-trimethoxyacetophenone. To date, the halogenated chalcones have not been isolated. Progress towards their syntheses will offer additional chalcone derivatives of potential biological importance and will be discussed.

Moderators
Speakers

Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:00am - 8:20am
123 Zeis Hall

8:00am

Faculty and Olli Moderators
John Wood, Charles Bennett, Brian Dennison, Chris Bell, Leah Matthews, Tamie Beldue, Virginia Derryberry, Leisa Rundquist, Laura Bond, Rebecca Hale, Richard Robinson, Jen Ward, Kitti Reynolds, Herman Holt, Charles James, Sally Wasileksi, Lyndi Hewitt, Heidi Kelley, Agya Boakye-Boaten, Anne Slatton, Kirk Boyle, Evan Gurney, Lori Horvitz, Lorena Russell, Sonya DiPalma, Susan Reiser, Adam Whitley, Dave Erb, Lora Holland, Bill Utz, Patrick Foo, Judy Leavitt, Rob Bowen, Chris Nicolay

Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:00am - 5:00pm
UNC Asheville

8:20am

The Effects of Pitcher Plant Hybridization on Oviposition of the Pitcher Plant Midge
Diptera species like midges and mosquitoes produce lots of offspring and, as they provide no parental care, the initial choice of where they eggs is crucial to their offspring’s survival. Although mosquito and midge adults are terrestrial, their larvae are aquatic and adult females may use multiple factors to help select an ideal pool of water for eggs, including the pool’s likelihood of evaporating, its available nutrients, and the presence of predators. One midge, Metriocnemus knabi, and one mosquito, Wyeomyia smithii, are so particular that it only lays eggs in the leaves of the purple pitcher plant, Sarracenia purpurea, a pitcher plant species that hosts a community of invertebrate species in its pitchers instead of digesting these insects as prey. In the mountains of North Carolina, S. purpurea var. montana hybridizes with the mountain sweet pitcher, S. jonesii, a species that does not harbor aquatic invertebrates. Over two years, I examined whether ovipositing female flies avoided hybrids, as expected if hybrids provide a less hospitable environment for larvae. In 2013, I found both species of fly were more common in S. purpurea var. montana pitchers. In 2014, I examined whether adult females avoid hybrids due to characteristics of their pitcher water, or of the leaf itself. I tested this hypothesis by swapping water from S. purpurea var. montana pitchers with water from hybrids. I found that hybrids had fewer larvae regardless of which type of water they held, suggesting that females select sites based on characteristics of the leaves, themselves.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:20am - 8:40am
014 Zeis Hall

8:20am

Syntheses of Gamma-Lactam Analogues of Combretastatin A4
This research examines the synthesis of gamma-lactam analogues of combretastatin A4 (CA4). Many anticancer drugs such as CA4 pose equal risk to normal and cancerous cells. In the case of CA4, enhancement of pharmacokinetic features such as specificity and energetic stability are desirable whilst maintaining tubulin binding activity. This warrants the search for synthetic routes to gamma-lactam analogues of CA4. In CA4, tubulin binding activity has been attributed to the cis arrangement of two specific rings around an ethylene bridge, and molecules that contain the beta-lactam functionality (beta-lactams are the functional portion in penicillins) have been explored as appropriate substitutes for this bridge to compromise cytotoxicity to normal cells. Gamma-Lactams are an appealing replacement for the alkene bridge seen in CA4, and have the potential of maintaining appropriate activity for tubulin binding. To date, no groups have aimed to expand territory towards gamma-lactams as medicinally significant moieties which may facilitate similar spatial arrangements of the rings in a more stable fashion than their beta-lactam counterparts. The synthetic route explored to access these CA4 derivatives utilizes lithium diisopropylamide to cleave beta-lactams, permitting expansion to the desired gamma-lactams. To prepare the necessary beta-lactam precursors, specific ketenes generated from their respective acid chlorides, and imines were used in a Staudinger [2+2] cycloaddition. Generation of CA4 beta-lactam derivatives via imines has recently been the focus of this study as success has been found in preparing various imines that can undergo the beta-lactam transformation. The specific strategies surrounding the synthesis of beta and gamma-lactams will be discussed in detail.

Moderators
Speakers

Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:20am - 8:40am
123 Zeis Hall

8:20am

Pompeian Shrine Serpents: Re-evaluating the Significance of Serpents in Lararium Paintings
Household shrine paintings in Pompeii typically depict two Lares, or household gods, the genius of the paterfamilias, and a serpent. The common interpretation for the presence of the serpent is that it represents the genius of the paterfamilias. This interpretation has problems with it, however, and the significance of the serpent must be reevaluated. Considering the size and prominence of the serpent in the lararium painting, the snake was significant in Roman religion, and indicates snake worship in cult practices. I will explore the significance of the serpents found in household shrines by analyzing lararium paintings found in Pompeii and the ways in which serpents are depicted. The serpent iconography will be compared to that of native Italic gods and goddesses who were associated with serpents, the use of serpents in Etruscan funerary art, and the use of snakes in Greco-Roman myth. This will illustrate that serpents held significance in Roman religion and serpents in the lararium had an apotropaic function that worked to ward off harmful spirits from the house, and grant fertility, health and prosperity to the familias.

Moderators
Speakers

Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:20am - 8:40am
406 Wilma Sherrill Center

8:20am

2015 Miami International Boat Show’s Social Media Strategy and Tactics
This research project examines the social media strategy and tactics from the February 2015 Miami International Boat Show. Overall show attendance and the total number of boats on display were up two percent each from 2014 due to an increase in social media efforts by the sponsors. Advertising techniques have evolved to include the world of social media platforms such as Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and YouTube. With the use of these social media platforms, primarily video and images, the Miami International Boat Show and their sponsors experienced a higher level of online engagement to draw in potential buyers and attendees. This project seeks to find where the Miami International Boat Show excelled in their social media strategy and tactics. Using social media analytical tools such as KeyHole, Ragan, Sprout Social and Hootesuite as well as talking directly with the Media Center, data was collected throughout the weeklong boat show for analysis.

Moderators
Speakers

Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:20am - 8:40am
012 Karpen Hall

8:30am

The U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit
Climate change poses a grave threat to countless regions of the United States, including exposed coastal towns, vulnerable farmlands, fire-prone forests, and multitudes of other American landscapes. The U.S. Climate Resilience Toolkit—created in response to the President’s Climate Action Plan and Executive Order 13653 by a partnership of federal agencies and organizations led by NOAA’s Climate Program Office, partnering with UNC Asheville’s National Environmental Modeling and Analysis Center (NEMAC)—intends to respond to rising sea levels, floods, droughts, extreme temperatures, and other climate stressors in a positive manner. The CRT provides narratives of innovative and successful community endeavors (dubbed “taking action” stories), along with easy-to-use tools, to combat the negative effects of climate change and inspire new initiatives and collaborations. The CRT is intentionally written in an accessible and personable manner, establishing a connection between often dense scientific literature and application-oriented government professionals, businesses and communities, and the climate-interested public. The CRT launched in November of 2014 with great success, receiving nearly 300,000 views in the first two weeks published. However, work on the CRT is far from complete, with new taking action stories and tools added on a near-weekly basis. Over the coming months, the current topics of coastal flood risk, ecosystem vulnerability, food resilience, human health, and water resources will be expanded to include tribal nations, energy supply and infrastructure, and transportation and supply chain.

Speakers
Sponsors

Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:30am - 10:30am
Wilma Sherrill Center Concourse

8:30am

Learning to See: Renovating the Asheville High School Photo Club to Improve Learning and Sustainability

While documents and art are limited in their ability to encompass the other’s properties, often leaving documents devoid of interest and art devoid of fact, photographs can encompass both sides becoming an incredibly powerful tool for social change. Photographs can be both visually arousing and factually evident (in so far as they portray the photographer’s interpretation of the action.) For this reason, I believe it is important to expose students to the nuanced techniques and capabilities of photography. For the past three years I have worked with the Asheville High School student-begun photo club creating some basic digital assignments. This year, my community partner Kristina Shriver – the photo club faculty sponsor – and I introduced alternative analog processes such as pinhole cameras and cyanotypes. Through these projects,  the students explored principles such as line, composition, and exposure time as well as the relationship between an interconnected person, place, and thing (the title of our end of the year photo show.) I also curated a gallery show so that the students could gain exposure for their work. Finally, I created various promotional tools (posters, a website) and an instructional binder of such tools, assignment worksheets, and gallery contact information to promote sustainability of the club. This presentation explores the process of reevaluating the goals of the club, what we did to ensure progress, the difficulties in doing both tasks, and ultimately the benefit to the school and art communities. 



Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:30am - 10:30am
Wilma Sherrill Center Concourse

8:30am

Making Home in Asheville: How Oral History Celebrates and Sustains Jewish Community
Since the time of the Torah, Jewish communities have been tight knit and often at odds with others due to anti-Semitism. After the Holocaust and as a consequence of the Diaspora, Jewish communities evolved in different ways around the world. Throughout American cities, Jewish Community Centers have been established to be a center for Jewish life and learning, offering services for Jews and non-Jews alike.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:30am - 10:30am
Wilma Sherrill Center Concourse

8:30am

Promoting Community Wellbeing through Locally Grown Organic Produce and Health Education

The United States has an alarming increased rate of chronic diseases such as obesity, diabetes, cancer, heart disease and stroke. As a nation we spend 86% of our healthcare dollars on treating these chronic diseases and their symptoms. Instead we should start to shift our focus towards prevention through community engagement and health education. Flying Fish CSA is an organic, four season, vegetable farm located on the edge of North Asheville in Weaverville, NC.  This is a small family business that provides locally grown produce with the help of community volunteers. They believe whole-heartedly that as more Asheville residents eat locally, they will improve their health and strengthen the community a whole. This local farm was in dire need for new marketing and to be able to provide education on the importance of eating fresh organic produce as well as the health benefits of a primarily plant based diet. For this public service project I worked with Seth Salmon, the owner of Flying Fish CSA, to find ways to get connected in the community and provide educational resources which would benefit his farm as well as the community. We decided to create marketing materials that educate and inform the public on the health benefits of purchasing locally grown organic vegetables. We also wanted to create an opportunity for people in the community to get hands on experience working on the farm. I led a group of volunteers on a project to convert a shed into a tiny house for seasonal interns to get an insightful experience while living on the farm. This project taught me the skills necessary to better communicate health information to the public and to create a sustainable opportunity for future volunteers and interns to learn, grow, and thrive through community agriculture.



Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:30am - 10:30am
Wilma Sherrill Center Concourse

8:30am

Sustaining Healthy Living Programs in Our Community: Producing a Policies & Procedures Manual for the YMCA of WNC
The YMCA of WNC’s nutrition department plans and distributes afterschool snacks for all partner schools to provide healthy fruits, vegetables, and whole grains to students. A more recent endeavor is the creation and management of a Healthy Living Pantry (HLP), Healthy Living Mobile Kitchen (HLMK), and Healthy Living Mobile Market (HLMM). Through these programs, the YMCA of WNC is able to distribute healthy food and provide nutrition education to underserved individuals and families. Despite notable growth and outreach in the year 2014, there was a need and opportunity to improve the functioning of the nutrition department as a whole. Management within the department realized they were in need of policies and procedures to document all rules, regulations, and instructions on how each program in the department is run. This public service project served to create such content for the HLP, HLMK, and HLMM. Working in these programs the prior six months provided me with valuable insight into how organizations like the YMCA work. The experience demonstrated the importance of policies and procedures to guide volunteers and employees in their work and the ability of an organization to adapt to constant change. Therefore, I pulled from my experiences and the organization’s best practices to create a document that provides volunteers and employees guidance, but that is also adaptable to allow for any changes the organization might face in the future. The final policies and procedures manual will serve as a one-stop guide, which the nutrition department can utilize to effectively run programs and recruit, train, and manage employees and volunteers. Going forward, the policies and procedures manual will continue to help the department maximize the outcomes of its work.

Speakers
Sponsors

Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:30am - 10:30am
Wilma Sherrill Center Concourse

8:30am

Mechanized Drawing
The Arduino is an open-source computing platform used to develop interactive electronic projects that interact with the world. Taking these capabilities into account, and combining them with an artistic medium, an Arduino microprocessor can facilitate creating works of art. Using precise calculations, the Arduino controlled project produces images using standard art supplies (pencils/pens/paper) and generates proportionate drawings that would be nearly impossible for a human to produce. Pushing the limits of the Arduino and it's creative capabilities are what makes New Media, 'New' Media.

Moderators
Speakers

Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:30am - 10:30am
Wilma Sherrill Center Concourse

8:30am

A Celebration of Health: Planning a Mid-Size Health Conference for Racial Minorities of Buncombe County
African Americans living in Western North Carolina have higher rates of preventable diseases, such as Type II Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease, than other racial groups in the area.  Asheville Buncombe Institute of Parity Achievement (ABIPA) is actively working to diminish the health disparities that exist in the African American community.  The “Celebration of Health: A Conference on Awareness and Prevention” is one of many strategies they’re implementing to achieve their overarching goal.  The conference aims to educate and inspire community members to take control of their health, through preventive means and/or practical disease management techniques.  Due to unfavorable weather conditions, the conference was rescheduled, which hindered the overall planning process. The rescheduled date, however, was more conducive to our goals of teaching community members effective ways to improve their overall health (such as outdoor gardening lessons). The conference will include other educational breakout sessions, including cooking classes, yoga sessions, and nutrition education courses. The purpose of the service project is to develop a conference manual, detailing the planning strategies that were used; for instance, who was contacted and when, when promotional materials were distributed, and how to effectively budget for a mid-size health conference. The manual will assist ABIPA and its partners to efficiently implement similar health conferences in the future to empower, inspire, and enlighten more community members.  

Speakers
Sponsors

Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:30am - 10:30am
Wilma Sherrill Center Concourse

8:30am

A comparison of the Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) study materials and the UNCA HWP Curriculum
Health education is an important profession that continues to grow and expand its presence in the understanding of the impact of health behaviors and the prevention of disease on individual and population health. The process to establish the current Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) credential began in the early 1970’s in the United States. The main goal was to establish standards of professional practice and to clarify the role of health educators to help establish a respected and successful profession. The certification of health education specialists (CHES) has evolved in the United States (U.S.) over the past 50 years and now includes an advanced-level certification (MCHES). To be eligible to take the CHES exam, one must be in his/her last semester of coursework in “health education” OR provide evidence of 25 semester credits specifically addressing the Seven Areas of Competency. This project will identify strengths and weaknesses within the HWP curriculum for the preparation of the CHES exam.

Speakers
Sponsors

Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:30am - 10:30am
Wilma Sherrill Center Concourse

8:30am

CarePartners Orthotics and Prosthetics Device Reference
The purpose of this project was to create a useful resource for physicians and clients that utilize the services at the CarePartners Orthotics and Prosthetics clinic. This resource is an informational book that provides definitions and examples of specific technology and services provided by the clinic. It specifically aims to simplify the process of referring patients to practitioners at the clinic and allow those patients to understand what services will be available to them. Although time constraints did not allow me to complete the book, I organized its beginning stages and completed the first section. I took notes on the different elements surrounding prosthetics and orthotics and learned technical terms used in the field. I also documented the technology involved in assembling the devices. The book includes pictures of such technology along with other necessary equipment for clients and descriptions of their functions. This allows clients to know what they need and to be able to ask for specific services. Physicians are also able to use the information in this book to accurately refer patients to the clinic.

Speakers
Sponsors

Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:30am - 10:30am
Wilma Sherrill Center Concourse

8:30am

Eat Smart Move More North Carolina: Updating Policy Strategy Platform for 2015
North Carolina ranks 25th in adult obesity and 18th in childhood obesity in the nation. Eat Smart Move More North Carolina (ESMMNC) is a state-level organization focused on healthy lifestyle initiatives and education. The ESMMNC mission is “To reverse the rising tide of obesity and chronic disease among North Carolinians by helping them to eat smart, move more and achieve a healthy weight”. In 2012, the ESMMNC developed a policy strategy platform, an important document to provide a link between current legislative updates and its NC plan for obesity prevention in North Carolina. The purpose of this public service project was to update the ESMMNC 2012 policy strategy platform for 2015. These updates reflect recommended changes made in the North Carolina Plan and Healthy Plan NC 2020, another ESMMNC document. New strategies were added from the current ESMMNC plan which included state legislative actions. The final product is an updated ESMMNC policy strategies platform (2015), which will be available on the ESMMNC website. This document will provide quick access to current information on obesity prevention policy strategies. This public service project provided insights into the challenges associated with keeping advocates and other health promoters updated on policy changes, as well as the amount of work that is involved in providing the public with this information.

Speakers
Sponsors

Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:30am - 10:30am
Wilma Sherrill Center Concourse

8:30am

Educational and Nutritional Impacts of School-Based Gardening Programs
Unhealthy dietary habits in early childhood years tend to be maintained in adulthood, leading to potential health risks, such as obesity, high blood pressure, and other chronic life illnesses. Because these habits are formed at a young age, schools all across the United States are implementing school based gardening programs to help prevent the onset of chronic illnesses. These gardening programs have the potential to directly influence dietary and nutritional habits and informal and formal learning habits through interactive and hands-on environments. FEAST (Fast Easy Affordable Sustainable Tasty) is an Asheville school and community-based gardening program that promotes healthy eating and family nutrition through cooking classes and gardening experiences geared toward children of all ages. The main goal of this public service project was to show FEAST’s positive nutritional impacts on the students involved based on their collected survey data on dietary changes and overall experience. The final products of this public service project are a PowerPoint slide deck and narrative report of the findings based on organization and analysis of previously collected data from the program evaluations, as well as a revised program questionnaire for future use. These resources will be used to showcase the impacts of FEAST programs to potential donors and will be included in grant proposals so that this program can continue to teach children in the Asheville community about the food that they put in their bodies.

Speakers
Sponsors

Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:30am - 10:30am
Wilma Sherrill Center Concourse

8:30am

Health Program evaluation Within Schools and Children First Learning Centers
Children First/ Communities (CF/CIS) in Schools is a non-profit organization that provides food pantries financial assistance, clothing closets, afterschool care, and other programming for underserved families. The overall mission is to help these families, and to support children to stay and succeed in school. In 2014, CF received a grant from Mission Health to conduct the 5-2-1 Almost None childhood obesity prevention program in schools and afterschool centers. The purpose of this public service project was to provide technical and other support for evaluating the 5-2-1 Almost None program. Since February of 2015, we have been entering data from Children First learning centers as well as two elementary schools within Buncombe County, including information about number of children attending the learning centers, provision of healthy snacks, engaging children in physical activity, and involving parents and other family members in the program. The product associated with this project is a report on the program and how it met its goals. This report will help Children First/ Communities in Schools secure future funding for the 5-2-1 Almost None and other programs.

Speakers
Sponsors

Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:30am - 10:30am
Wilma Sherrill Center Concourse

8:30am

Improvements in Health Literacy in the CooperRiis Community
Current research demonstrates the importance of considering health literacy, or the ability of individuals to understand basic health information, in order to design physical health promotion materials for a particular audience. Incorporating awareness of health literacy levels can improve access to care, enhance learning, and inform decision making. The purpose of this project was to improve the health literacy of multiple documents and create new materials for CooperRiis Community Work and Service orientations, volunteer and intern orientations, and Family Education Day. Organizational needs and preferences for material design were discussed with CooperRiis and the materials were enhanced and created utilizing evidence-based health literacy guides and literature. The materials will be utilized in the future to assist with the transitions of residents, volunteers, and interns into the CooperRiis Community as well as to better inform the residents' families on the importance of community work and engagement in the healing community setting. 

Speakers
Sponsors

Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:30am - 10:30am
Wilma Sherrill Center Concourse

8:30am

The WNC Winter Tailgate Market: Supporting Locavorism throughout the Winter
Western North Carolina is a resource rich area with local farmers who are passionate about their produce and passionate about sharing it with the community. It is important to keep this close-knit community together in order to grow and share the experience and health benefits. During the colder winter months, many people find it hard to stay in touch with their fresh, local diets. The Western North Carolina Tailgate market wanted to remedy this problem by setting up an easily assessable indoor location that is available to the public weekly. Managing the WNC winter tailgate has enabled me the experience of seeing the high demand from the community. In order to keep this energy alive, I will create a market manager manual with all the information for a successfully run market to uphold the community.

Speakers
Sponsors

Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:30am - 10:30am
Wilma Sherrill Center Concourse

8:30am

Walking Mindfully With Middle Schoolers: The Development of a Slacklining Curriculum
This poster will explore the creation and facilitation of a twelve-week, bi-weekly afterschool program in slacklining and mindfulness, which is taking place at Asheville Middle School (AMS). The program is made possible through the In Real Life (IRL) foundation, sponsored by the Asheville City Schools Foundation. Slacklining is a newly emerging sport that involves learning to balance on a dynamic piece of webbing that is tensioned between two points. Once balance is achieved, various tricks and static poses can be incorporated into the sport. Mindfulness is a mental state or attitude that can be achieved by intentionally and non-judgmentally focusing one’s attention on the present moment. Slacklining requires an immense amount of focus and a seamless connection between body and mind, essentially turning the sport into a physical mindfulness practice. This public service project (psp) involved the administration of this program and the development of a curriculum document for future use by facilitators and students. The psp poster will explore the connections between slacklining and mindfulness and will detail the activities conducted in the program, as well as the effects of the program. The poster will also present a discussion of the various challenges that were faced throughout the facilitation of this program and some ways in which the program could potentially improve in the future. The slacklining curriculum document reflects these challenges and improvements and will hopefully be utilized for future programs at AMS and elsewhere. The development of slacklining and mindfulness curricula has the potential to offer students opportunities for new and exciting forms of physical exercise, a chance to begin cultivating the ability to sustain their attention for longer periods of time while dealing with distractions, and a chance to develop greater self-awareness skills as well as relaxation and stress-management techniques.

Speakers
Sponsors

Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:30am - 10:30am
Wilma Sherrill Center Concourse

8:30am

A Methodology for Appropriate Testing When Data is Heterogeneous Using EXCEL
A Methodology for Appropriate Testing When Data is Heterogeneous was originally published and copy written in the mid-1990s in Turbo Pascal using the a16 bit operating system. While working on an ergonomic dissertation (Yearout, 1987), the perceptual data was determined to be heterogeneous and not normal. Dr. Milliken and Johnson, the authors of Analysis of Messy Data Volume I: Designed Experiments (1989),advised that Satterthwaite’s Approximation with Bonferroni’s Adjustment to correct for pairwise error be used to analyze the heterogeneous data. This technique of applying linear combinations with adjusted degrees of freedom allowed the use of t-Table criteria to make group comparisons without using standard nonparametric techniques. Thus data with unequal variances and unequal sample sizes could be analyzed without losing valuable information. Variances to the 4th power were so large that they could not be reentered into basic calculators. The solution was to develop an original software package which was written in Turbo Pascal on a 7 ¼ inch disk 16 bit operating system. Current operating systems of 32 and 64 bits and more efficient programming languages have made the software obsolete and unusable. Using the old system could result in many returns be either incorrect or the system would terminate. The purpose of this research was to develop a spreadsheet algorithm with multiple interactive EXCEL worksheets that will efficiently apply Satterthwaite’s Approximation with Bonferroni’s Adjustment to solve the messy data problem. To insure that the pedagogy is accurate the resulting package was successfully test tested in the classroom with academically diverse students. A comparison between this technique and EXCEL’s Add-Ins Analysis Toolbar for a t-test Two-Sample Assuming Unequal Variances was conducted using several different data sets. The results of this comparison was that the EXCEL Add-Ins returned incorrect significant differences. Engineers, ergonomists, and social scientists at home and abroad would find the developed program very useful. A major benefit is that spreadsheet algorithms will continue to be current regardless of evolving operating systems’ status


Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:30am - 10:30am
Wilma Sherrill Center Concourse

8:30am

Analytical Modeling of Unwanted Interstitial Growth in Silver Nanowire Production
Current methods of synthesizing silver nanowires on ferroelectric, periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystals are limited due to unwanted interstitial growth of silver between nanowires. It is believed that surface imperfections on the crystal wafer become sights of electric field abnormalities that cause the growth away from the180domain boundaries, the location of desired wire sites. An analytical model is prepared which investigates the electric field abnormalities created by screening charges both at topological deformities (i.e. scratches) and at the domain boundaries of the PPLN crystal. Results from the model are compared to results from colleagues using experimental and computational methods. The size and shape of the ferroelectric lithographic silver nanowires on PPLN make them appropriate for use as wires in integrated circuits or as surface enhanced Raman Spectroscopy substrates

Speakers
Sponsors

Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:30am - 10:30am
Wilma Sherrill Center Concourse

8:30am

Fast Radio Bursts in the Intergalactic Medium
The research I performed was an attempt to generate a mathematical model to find the amount of scattering present in the intergalactic medium (IGM) and the scattering angles associated with fast radio bursts (FRB’s). This research was prompted by a report (Thornton et al, 2013) of millisecond radio bursts emanating from cosmological distances. Working with Professor Brian Dennison, we were able to generate several equations which incorporate Minkowski’s general relativity in spherical coordinates, the expansion of the universe with contributions from both luminous and dark matter to try and quantify the FRB phenomenon. These equations were entered into a piece of mathematical software, Mathematica, to evaluate the complex integrals that were generated. The data set produced could eventually be useful to radio astronomers when dealing with observations of FRB’s. This idea is very complicated, and this project naturally leads to further work. But through our efforts, a big step has been toward understanding the FRB phenomenon more fully.

Speakers
Sponsors

Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:30am - 10:30am
Wilma Sherrill Center Concourse

8:30am

Gamma Ray Transmission Through Snow
The recent snow storm has made it possible to test the claim in a US Army survival book that 51.6 cm of snow is adequate to shield from residual gamma radiation following a nuclear disaster. In this book there was an illustration of different materials that could be used as temporary radiation buffers. Surprisingly, snow was on the list. The survival book states that 51.6 cm of snow is adequate to shield from residual gamma radiation following a nuclear disaster. An inexpensive experimental setup was easy constructed in order to test the survival handbook’s claim. Five tests were completed, each at different snow depths ranging from 58.9 cm down to 7.62 cm. In each of the 5 tests, readings were taken with and without snow on the path leading to the Geiger counter. The data gathered shows quite clearly that snow does inhibit the transmission of gamma rays, as much as a 20% reduction in one case. This experiment shows that even innocuous materials will shield from gamma radiation with the only dependence being on the thickness of the material between the source and the Geiger counter. This experiment also leads to the next phase which will involve testing more conventional materials and explore ways to improve their efficiency.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:30am - 10:30am
Wilma Sherrill Center Concourse

8:30am

Methods For Pinpointing And Identifying An Unknown Underground Radiation Source
A site in Franklin, NC has been located which has an unknown radiation source underground. Preliminary surveys of this site have indicated that the output radiation of this source is significantly higher than that of environmental background radiation. Field analysis is done on this site to determine what the physical nature of the source is and to indentify it if possible. Data is collected in the localized surrounding area using a Geiger counter on a grid layout characterizing the intensity of the radiation. The depth of the source is determined by estimating the thickness and characteristics of the material medium between the source and the measured locations. Using known data on shielding properties of various materials such as concrete and packed soil in conjunction with collected data, the underground source of radiation may be identified. The detected radiation peak intensity just at the surface is significantly higher than average background radiation by two orders of magnitude which suggests assessing safety of this site.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:30am - 10:30am
Wilma Sherrill Center Concourse

8:30am

Methods of Data Analysis on Scanning Electron Microscopy Images of Synthesized Silver Nanowires
Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of silver nanowires synthesized through ferroelectric lithography are analyzed in order to correlate physical aspects of the nanowires to their growth conditions. In ferroelectric lithography silver is preferentially photo reduced at the 180 degree domain boundaries of lithium niobate substrates. A method of image analysis is developed to acquire quantitative data to test the repeatability of obtaining certain wire properties for given deposition parameters. Size, shape, spacing, orientation, and linear density of the nanoparticles making up the wires are quantitatively measured. The spatial distribution of wires and nanoparticles on the ferroelectric substrate as a function deposition times is also studied. Theoretical models and results of computational analysis on the dynamics of the particles during the deposition process are compared to experimental findings of this work.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:30am - 10:30am
Wilma Sherrill Center Concourse

8:30am

Modeling E&M fields within Periodically Poled Ferroelectric Templates
An electric field model for ferroelectric templates examines a novel lithography technique which is used in the growth of nanowires. In ferroelectric lithography silver is selectively deposited at the 180 degree domain boundaries of ferroelectric substrates. Current understanding of nanowire production does not have a well-documented explanation of both desired domain boundary wires and undesired interstitial growth. To assist, a model of the electric fields near the surface of ferroelectric templates was created, specifically focusing on periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN). This model was then utilized to determine how various surface imperfections and material attributes, such as screening properties, affected the electric field and therefore nanowire growth. To test this model a discrete event simulation of the paths of multiple particles was compared to scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images from actual depositions of AgNO3 on PPLN samples. The results and methodology are given here to improve silver nanowires synthesis for use in applications such as surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and disinfection.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:30am - 10:30am
Wilma Sherrill Center Concourse

8:30am

Modeling Fast Radio Bursts in Stellar Coronae
Fast radio bursts are astronomically observed radio frequency bursts which display dispersion, i.e. the speed of propagation is frequency-dependent and higher frequencies are detected before lower frequencies. This dispersion is caused by propagation through plasma, however, the location of this plasma is unknown. One model proposes that the bursts originate as stellar flares from galactic stars and experience dispersion within the coronal plasma present near the star. In addition to the frequency-dependent delay created by plasma dispersion, these flares would also encounter frequency-dependent refraction from the plasma, altering the path-length of the radiation, and hence further shifting the arrival time of different frequencies. An inverse square corona model is used to develop a geometrical treatment of the refraction. Using this treatment, the variation in path length is computed as a function of frequency, given particular physical parameters of the star and the radiation. These calculations will provide a point of comparison between the flare model and the data collected from FRB observations.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:30am - 10:30am
Wilma Sherrill Center Concourse

8:30am

Modeling Surface Enhancement due to Silver Nanowires
Silver nanowires created by ferroelectric lithography are studied to determine if they are appropriate for use as Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) substrates. Raman spectroscopy is used to identify and characterize materials based on the vibrational energy shifts resulting in inelastically scattered light. This effect is ordinarily so weak that it is difficult to detect, but this obstacle can be overcome through surface-enhancement which occurs near nanometer-scale roughened silver surfaces. Surface enhancement occurs because of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) on the silver nanoparticles. The resonant frequency of the plasmon, a quantized electron density present in the solid, is lowered into the visible region when near nanometer-scale curved particles, enhancing the light scattered during spectroscopy. The goal of this research project is, using the current theory of SPR in the literature, model the nanowires as a pearl-necklace arrangement of silver spheres, and predict the enhancement effects due to different sizes and spacing of spheres. Ultimately, these predictions will be used to study the effectiveness of silver nanowires in SERS, where they may be applied as substrates in low-detection limit and single-molecule spectroscopies.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:30am - 10:30am
Wilma Sherrill Center Concourse

8:30am

Preservation of Silver Nanowires in Polydimethylsiloxane
Nanowires and structures have potential applications to various fields and technologies including integrated circuits, solar cell efficiency, and spectroscopy. Silver nanowires currently being synthesized by ferroelectric lithography at the University of North Carolina Asheville are wiped clean from the periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) after characterization so the substrates may be reused. By encasing the wires in epoxy, they may be preserved and analyzed at a later date. These wires are important because of their potential for spatially dependant Raman scattering enhancement. It is hypothesized that due to the nanoscale curvature of the silver the Raman scattering will be enhanced significantly in the interstice between silver nanoparticles. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has proven effective in encasing the silver nanoparticles without damaging the crystal substrates. This silicone based epoxy is optically clear and flexible, both convenient traits when testing spatially dependant characteristics. However, application of the PDMS has previously disturbed the relative positions of the nanoparticles. Several methods have been employed to eliminate this disturbance by using molds and varying pour and cure techniques. Once the wires have been removed from the substrate with their relative placement preserved, they will be analyzed as possible tunable substrates for Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering; potentially useful for single molecule spectroscopy.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:30am - 10:30am
Wilma Sherrill Center Concourse

8:40am

Consequences of terrestrial egg laying in amphibians: a comparison of embryonic oxygen sensitivity in two Ambystomatid salamanders
Many amphibians lay their eggs in seasonal ponds. To avoid the threat of suffocation and intense resource competition that is typical of these ephemeral ponds, the ability to quickly grow and metamorphose is of paramount importance. Typically, low dissolved oxygen presents an unfavorable condition to larvae, prolonging time until general metamorphic size is reached. Therefore, they may respond by either taking longer to metamorphose, yet reaching a favorable size, or by metamorphosing smaller, but leaving the highly competitive pond environment sooner. We studied Ambystoma maculatum, who like most Ambystomatids, lays its eggs aquatically. We also studied Ambystoma opacum, who lays its eggs terrestrially under moist soil. We examined embryonic development of these two species under laboratory conditions, comparing growth, development, and hatching success under a range of dissolved oxygen concentrations as well as in a moist, terrestrial environment. Because A. maculatum is used to developing in aquatic environments with lower dissolved oxygen than the terrestrial habitats of A. opacum, we hypothesized that their embryos and larvae will develop faster and/or be larger at metamorphosis, particularly in lower oxygen environments. Our study concluded that while A. maculatum did develop faster in all treatments, the difference between species was greatest in higher oxygen treatments, instead of the predicted lower treatments. Treatment differences showed no significant effect on mass except in A. maculatum (2013) where larvae in low oxygen treatment were significantly larger than those in higher oxygen treatments. 


Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:40am - 9:00am
014 Zeis Hall

8:40am

Determining the Gallic Acid Concentrations in Red Wines using Reverse Phase HPLC with UV-Detection
Polyphenols are a form of antioxidants which consist of a three-membered flavan ring system that bind to metal cations inhibiting the cations’ ability of binding to DNA and producing free radicals. Such free radicals are known to cause neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. Wine, resulting from fermenting the grape with their skin components, contains polyphenols. Due to the pigment within the skin of the grape used in fermentation, red wine has higher amounts of these polyphenols and the amount and type of polyphenols within red wine has been shown to decrease the amount of cholesterol in the blood. However, it has been shown that iron-deficiency anemia may arise, have worsened symptoms, or maybe prolonged when red wines is consumed that contain the polyphenol gallic acid. This study utilizes refurbished High Performance Liquid Chromatographs (HPLC) with Ultraviolet (UV) detection to measure the gallic acid polyphenol in red wines because red wines decrease risks of neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases yet the gallic acid molecule increases the risk of chronic anemia. The research involved creating an efficient mobile phase and a method of extracting, measuring and analyzing gallic acid concentrations in three different types of red wines known for having high resveratrol concentrations, and analyzing iron binding by gallic acid. The study found there was variance among different brands of the same type of red wine and variance among red wine types when analyzed using HPLC with UV detection.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:40am - 9:00am
123 Zeis Hall

8:40am

Skylla and the Etruscan Sea-Monster: Artistic Elements in a Bronze Figurine from Cetamura del Chianti, Italy.
Among the archaeological finds from the Etruscan artisans’ sanctuary at Cetamura del Chianti is a pair of bronze figurines, one partial and one complete, depicting a creature with the head and torso of a human female ending in a pair of fish-tails. These figurines served to decorate the handle attachments of a bronze wine-bucket, situla L, which was found in a well at the site, with an estimated date in first half of the third century BCE. Just what this figure represents is unclear. Its designation is that of a Skylla figure, often depicted in Greek art from the fifth century BCE onward as a half-maiden, half-sea-monster with dogs protruding from her waist and genital area. However, as this figure displays no canine iconography, and as Cetamura is a distinctly Etruscan site, it seems more suitable to categorize her among the several varieties of sea monsters and merpeople found in Etruscan art before and during the third century, the females of which are sometimes referred to generically as Skyllae. In this paper, I will examine the figure from Cetamura in comparison with a number of Etruscan and Italian artifacts which are similar in iconography, location, chronology, and function. This will ultimately demonstrate that, of the surrounding artistic and cultural influences, she most closely represents an Etruscan artistic tradition of sea-monsters, whose shapes, poses, and iconographic varieties persisted from the Archaic Period well into the Roman encroachments of the third century BCE.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:40am - 9:00am
406 Wilma Sherrill Center

8:40am

Eye in the Sky: Augmenting Automated Flight with Computer Vision
In recent years, remote controlled helicopter flight has been one of the fastest growing hobbies worldwide. A leading factor in the rising interest is the ability to automate flight by using an onboard computer and GPS receiver to navigate through virtual waypoints without human interaction. At altitudes above trees, buildings, and power lines, the system gathers information from dozens of GPS satellites, making its location information remarkably accurate; however, below these obstructions or indoors, the GPS location can be dangerously inaccurate. My project presents a solution to this problem by using vision-based tracking, rather than GPS, to land a remote controlled helicopter on a landing pad. Additionally, by using inexpensive, commonly available hardware, as well as open-source computer vision software, this augmentation can be easily passed along to other hobbyists without breaking the bank.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:40am - 9:00am
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

8:40am

A Step Back in Time: An Economic Impact Analysis of Visitor Spending at Dressing Downton: Changing Fashion for Changing Times
This study conducts an economic impact analysis examining the spending and consumption behaviors of visitors at The Biltmore House, specifically from the Dressing Downton: Changing Fashion for a Changing Time exhibit. The study will focus on the first quarter of the year, examining the economic impact of the Dressing Down- ton exhibit from January through March. It will answer the questions: What level of economic impact does The Biltmore House provide for the Asheville community? Does the Dressing Downton exhibit increase visitor count to The Biltmore House, or does it simply change the time of the visit for a guest? Overall, does the Dressing Downton display increase economic impact for the area? Motivation for this study was generated because I am employed at The Biltmore Estate, and they are also the second largest employer in the region. It will be interested to determine the impact of the event and truly understand how every staff member of the estate is adding to the Asheville economic community. Also, I am interested in revealing to members of the community the level of impact that would be removed if the house was not open to the public. This study will reveal to the audience the increased spending in Buncombe county, North Carolina that is brought in through the Dressing Downton display over the first three months of the year. It will also reveal to Biltmore executives if the Dressing Downton: Changing Fashion for Changing Times was a successful exhibit that should continue throughout the rest of the year.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:40am - 9:00am
016 Karpen Hall

8:40am

Implementing Sustainable Social Justice Event Programming at the Undergraduate Level
The process of developing programming at the undergraduate level in an office with low levels of resources can prove challenging. Taking into account the high turnover rate among student employees, it is important to document and develop sustainable, accessible processes for rolling out and continuing new programs. The purpose of this work is to develop a year-long program of social justice discussion events that can be sustained and reasonably duplicated in future years. The ultimate goal of this project is to promote social justice issue awareness among students and strengthen campus ties with the community. The event series, entitled “Social Justice Coffee Hour,” focuses on a particular social justice issue each month. Community members and organizations whose work relates to the issue at hand are invited to give a presentation followed by student and faculty discussion. The aim is to increase awareness among the student body as well facilitate a symbiotic relationship between community work and academia. 

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:40am - 9:00am
407 Wilma Sherrill Center

8:40am

Public #LiberalArts #HigherEd Tweets
This study analyzes the effectiveness of social media tactics used by The Council of Public Liberal Arts Colleges (COPLAC) to increase national awareness of the council’s mission. The study evaluated how COPLAC uses Twitter to recognize member accomplishments, connect member institutions through common interests and goals, and share information on the current state of liberal arts higher education. Twitter is a very casual and timely platform. Therefore, the most appropriate and appealing phrasing and diction for COPLAC Twitter posts was analyzed. The goal of the research was to determine language that would engage users, while still representing a consortium of higher education institutions professionally. Twitter followers, reach, clicks, hashtags, and engagement were tracked using social media management software and recorded data. This analysis determines successful language, hashtags, and subject matter to increase engagement within the COPLAC Twitter community.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:40am - 9:00am
012 Karpen Hall

8:40am

Graphene at UNC Asheville: Synthesis, Characterization, & Potential Applications

This presentation will report on the progress made regarding the epitaxial growth of graphene on 6H silicon carbide through carbon dioxide laser ablation.  Alongside the continuing collaboration with nanomaterial specialists at Clemson University and the previous set of results, we have made significant changes to the experimental setup, which are reflected in our current analysis.  The most notable changes include the introduction of a constant argon flow across the substrate and shortened ablation time periods.  These updates will continue to refine our method of producing graphene and approaching our goal of identifying the correlation between ablation time and temperature with the number of graphene layers formed.  



Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:40am - 9:00am
212 Rhoades Robinson Hall

8:40am

Superheroes and Villains Through the Eyes of Children in Western North Carolina
Superheroes and villains have been around for decades and have continued to be an influential part of children’s lives. However, these superheroes and villains tend to be of very little diversity. I believe that race and gender minorities are under-represented in the comic industry and therefore I am interested in how this affects children’s perceptions. This study asks third and fifth grade students to create and illustrate a superhero and a villain. These drawings were analyzed based on gender, skin and costume color, super powers, and weaknesses amongst other criterion. Interviews were conducted with a random sample of students in an attempt to discover their illustration choices and what those choices mean. The heroes illustrated were mostly white, equally men and women, and wore mostly bright colors. The villains illustrated included more men than women, mostly white, and wore dark colors. These drawings correlate fairly well with most of the popular superheroes and villains in the media today. Students interviews also revealed that no matter if the villain is more powerful, or has more advanced weaponry, the superhero (almost) always defeats the villain. It is important to think about the role the media plays in influencing children’s perceptions. Something as simple as superheroes and villains can significantly influence children’s perceptions of the world.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:40am - 9:00am
246 Zageir Hall

8:50am

Re-collection Immemorial: Exploring the Fragility of Memory
Memory, the process of creating, interpreting, and recalling information, has always been essential for the human experience. However, for a tool of such significance, our memories are notoriously unreliable. It is this faulty nature that provided the driving force for Re-collection Immemorial. After discovering a study from Northwest University that found that the simple act of recalling alters memories to fit the present context, the artist produced a series of large scale drawings to reflect this idea. The fluidity of the materials used in these drawings, ink mixed with water, serves as a metaphor for making and recording memories. When the ink wash is pooled on the drawing surface it immediately stains, leaving a record, a memory, of its existence. As the water slowly evaporates, only ink reticulations are left behind; always lighter and less vibrant than their original state. Thus time, ink, and water collaborate to create a visual metaphor for experience and memory. After the water has evaporated, the process is repeated over and over again. Just as time passes and humans record more and more information to pile on top of the old, so does each drawing repeat the idea of layer on top of layer of information. Since every individual has different experiences, interpretations, and memories, the drawings use abstract forms that convey balance and complexity. This exploration into abstraction was influenced by contemporary non-representational artists such as Seana Reilly and Val Britton, as well as abstract expressionist such as Jackson Pollock. In sythesizing these works with the research, the series provided a sense of acceptance for the innate faulty nature of making and recalling memories.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 8:50am - 9:10am
237 Owen Hall

9:00am

Exploring a 32-Year Global Climatology of Tropical Cyclone Eye Sizes

A climatology of tropical cyclone eye sizes classified by “citizen scientists” through Cyclone Center, a website dedicated to the analysis of the Global Tropical Cyclone record of infrared satellite images, will be presented. Through this global analysis, a record of tropical cyclone eye size is determined from classifications of over 8,000 people for storms forming between 1978-2009. Images of tropical cyclones classified as “eye storms” are tabulated and placed into categories of eye sizes which form the basis of the climatology. Intensity estimates for individual tropical cyclone images are calculated through a process of synthesizing multiple weighted user classifications to form a consensus for the individual image. Tropical cyclone intensity estimates are then correlated to the specific categories of eye diameters in order to better distinguish the relationship between eye size and storm intensity.


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Wednesday April 22, 2015 9:00am - 9:20am
212 Rhoades Robinson Hall

9:00am

β3 Integrin Interaction with Guanine Nucleotide-Binding Proteins Gα12 and Gα13
Cell attachment, migration, and proliferation are essential processes for both normal tissue growth and malignant development. Guanine nucleotide-binding (G) proteins and integrins play key roles in the regulation of these processes. The G proteins Gα12 and Gα13 have 66% amino acid homology, yet differ in their downstream signaling function. While these proteins have been extensively studied in their own roles, the mechanisms by which they interact have only been partially examined.  Other investigators have shown C-terminal binding of β3 integrin to Gα13, but not Gα12. Utilizing epitope-tagged forms of Gα12 and Gα13, we examined their affinity for β3 integrin. We found that Gα12 showed greater binding affinity for β3 integrin than did Gα13, in both myc- and GFP-tagged forms. Furthermore, we utilized constitutively active and inactive forms of Ga12 and Gα13, as well as wild-type Gα12/13, to determine if this differential was due to the activation state. For Gα13, β3 integrin did not differ in affinity for the QL or wild type, and still showed no binding overall. Yet for Gα12, β3 integrin exhibited stronger binding for the GTP-bound form than the wild-type or GDP-bound forms. These findings suggest that Gα12 must be in the GTP-bound form to adequately bind β3 integrin in cells. Lastly, we tested NAAIRS sextet mutations to attain greater knowledge of specific structural features of Gα12 required for interaction with β3 integrin (Richie et al. 2013). Surprisingly, we found that two amino acid substitution mutants of Gα12 exhibited impaired binding to β3 integrin. This provides new structural details and serves as a basis for further research in examining these regions to specifically identify the properties that disallow binding action. As both Gα12 and Gα13 have been implicated in cancer pathways, understanding these interactions is critical for complete appreciation of the metastatic potential of epithelial cancer cells.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 9:00am - 9:20am
014 Zeis Hall

9:00am

Azo Compound Decomposition Into Toxic Aromatic Amines
Tattoos are becoming a more popular art form amongst younger generations. About 24% of Americans have one or more tattoos. Most tattoo inks are made from organic materials and are subdivided into two main classes of organic pigment are in us in tattoo and permanent make-up inks: azo pigments and polycyclic pigments1 PPD or p-Phenylenediamine is a chemical agent used as a coloring dye; it has also been known to cause allergies2, 3. Coloring agents, such as PPD is notoriously known for speeding up dyeing, improving pattern definition, to darken its red appearance in tattoos2. PPD is one amongst many other toxic aromatics that azo compounds can decompose into. This research focuses on the current literature studies assessing the toxicity of the pigments in tattoo inks that can decompose from overexposure to ultraviolet radiation from the sun.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 9:00am - 9:20am
123 Zeis Hall

9:00am

The Jewelry of Cetamura del Chianti
In this presentation, I will examine and discuss the jewelry found at the site of Cetamura del Chianti, in Tuscany, Italy. I will also discuss comparable pieces, the information and context provided by them, as well as my own theories as to the use and significance of these pieces. Jewelry is an important aspect of studying the material culture of the Classical world. It could have been both a luxury good as well as something very common, and was worn by almost everyone, just as it is today. In the ancient world, jewelry was not merely decorative. Pieces of jewelry were produced individually by artisans rather than mass-produced and thus were very personalized to the wearer, revealing details of their life and and tastes. It also had individual religious and superstitious uses as well, such as good luck tokens or signifiers of devotion to a certain deity. Studying this aspect of jewelry can reveal information on wider cultural and religious trends. For comparable pieces, I examined artifacts from Pompeii and the surrounding towns also destroyed by Vesuvius. This is because of the vast quantity of jewelry and other small personal items found at the site, as well as the comparable time periods of inhabitation between the eruption of Vesuvius in 79CE and the period most of the Cetamura pieces are dated to. Much of the Roman jewelry found at Cetamura is from the late Republic and early Imperial periods, as is much of the jewelry found at Pompeii.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 9:00am - 9:20am
406 Wilma Sherrill Center

9:00am

Teaching STEM: An educational website for the NC Festival of Science
This project consisted of building a website for the NC Festival of Science Scavenger Hunt. Each challenge in the scavenger hunt is based on standards from the North Carolina Standard Course of Study. The goal was to build the system that will run the scavenger hunt in such a way that its audience, in this case, 7th grade students, will find most engaging. Mini-games present real world problems to students with incremental levels of difficulty. Students were asked to demonstrate their understanding by creating or finding a real world example and submitting it through the website. The system supports authentication and the necessary special functions for curators, teachers, and students. Through trial runs in classrooms, the website was improved from student and instructor feedback.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 9:00am - 9:20am
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

9:00am

Substance Abuse Prevention: A Cost-Benefit Analysis
A cost-benefit analysis of the effectiveness of a specific substance abuse prevention program used in the United States called Keepin’ It REAL. This report will look at existing estimates of the costs of substance abuse, which include both social costs and direct costs to the government, and then use these estimates to evaluate the benefits of prevention. Seeks to answer the question, is the public’s investment in substance abuse prevention programs really worth the returns we are getting back out of them? This will hopefully help to enable policy and program managers to make informed decisions about resource allocations for substance abuse treatment policies, programs, and practices.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 9:00am - 9:20am
016 Karpen Hall

9:00am

Project Manager
The 2015 IEEE Southeast Conference Hardware Competition is designed to bring together universities in IEEE’s region 3 in friendly intercollegiate robotics competition. This year, the competition involves a white line on a black background that leads to four traditional road trip games. The games, and how they are played, include playing Simon for 15 seconds, writing IEEE on an Etch a Sketch, turning the top row of a Rubik’s cube 180 degrees and picking up a playing card off the top of the deck and bringing it to the finish line. These tasks are to be completed autonomously by a robot, with no input during a competition run, that has to fit within a 1ftx1ftx1ft cube and the judges must be able to see the games being played. Research went into completing the tasks themselves, integrating these tasks onto a single platform, as well as the design and organization process the team would use to complete the task. This project has been a rigorous lesson in the application of engineering principles to a real world problem. The team has made outstanding progress toward the goal of designing and building a competitive robot for the April 9th competition while remaining on time and on budget with all milestones met along the way.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 9:00am - 9:20am
213 Rhoades Robinson Hall

9:00am

Blog About It!: The Relationship Between Blogs, Social Media, and Fashion Merchandising
This research paper will examine the role that social media plays in fashion merchandising. Every fashion and clothing company must create a branded image to market to its consumers, while also differentiating themselves from other brands available in the market. An integral part of this process is utilizing social media in the most informed way possible. This paper will explore how companies use lifestyle blogs to brand and market their product more successfully, and how those blogs integrate social media. Data will be collected through analysis of hashtags, brand keywords, and sentiment analysis over a period of one month. Through examining which promotional tools are most effective, this paper will develop a perspective on how blogs affect the relationship between brand and consumption.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 9:00am - 9:20am
012 Karpen Hall

9:00am

Effects of Lumosity Brain Training on Memory, Flexibility, and Fluid Intelligence
Interest in improving cognitive function, especially through the use of technology such as web-based training programs, has been on the rise. One of the most popular of these programs, Lumosity™, claims that training particular sets of cognitive skills can result in widespread improvements in cognition, but there is little scientific evidence to support this. We identified two of these skills, cognitive flexibility, and memory as being of particular interest in exploring the efficacy of Lumosity™, and the mechanisms behind its claimed effects. To accomplish this, we recruited undergraduate students to participate in Lumosity™’s program, focusing on flexibility or memory-specific training tasks, for 6 weeks. Pre- and post-test measures of flexibility, memory and fluid intelligence from these groups were compared with those from three control groups: no-contact, active control with Sudoku puzzles, and active control with a crystallized intelligence training task. The data was statistically analyzed to observe any training based skill transfer to memory, flexibility and fluid intelligence. Our data will show whether Lumosity ™ training shows skill transfer outside of its gaming platform. Additionally, our data will provide an opportunity to comment on the use of brain training games and similar programs in pedagogy at the college level.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 9:00am - 9:20am
407 Wilma Sherrill Center

9:00am

Prosthetic Epistemologies: Cyborg Reconstructions of the Master’s Tools
My feminist inquiry project aims to critically assess historical and contemporary sites of power and resistance in which modern and post-modern technologies are socially constructed with the intention to explore realistic yet ideologically plausible feminist future situations. My deconstruction process will look at how technology exists as both an extension and by-product of its industrial capitalist-patriarchal roots, with the former being located within the jurisdiction of hegemonic institutions and the latter within liminal and potentially transgressive bounds. Donna Haraway’s conceptual themes of fragmented identity politics and cyborg mythology within “A Cyborg Manifesto” as well as Audre Lorde’s critical notion that “the master’s tools will never dismantle the master’s house” are critically synthesized to form questions concerned with accessibility and dualistic thinking in order to approach this project.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 9:00am - 9:20am
246 Zageir Hall

9:00am

Identities in Places: Toward and Anthropology and Sociology of Place
Panelists will discuss individual research projects into the relationship between place and identity at various sites in and around Asheville. A growing literature in Sociology and Anthropology that human beings and social groups become what they are in places, that places structure human activity and identity just as people with particular identities structure places. Places thus give sociologists and anthropologists observable clues about people in those places, the problems they face, and the way they have gone about solving those problems. Panelists will summarize their research individually and then discuss projects in light of the larger aims of their disciplines.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 9:00am - 10:30am
137 Zageir Hall

9:10am

Don't Show Your Dirty Laundry to the Neighbors: The Theatrics of Southern Culture
The women portrayed in this series show the private side of the woman who was brought up to be a “Southern Belle.” Based on personal observation, the artist depicts aristocratic Southern social culture as involving a great deal of manipulation in order to conceal imperfections and to display qualities which are socially acceptable. To highlight this perception, this series of drawings, “Don’t Show Your Dirty Laundry”, focuses on narratives about Southern women who pretend to be without moral defect and instead display qualities which are socially acceptable. This pressure to hide human emotions and characteristics is so strong that while the world is collapsing around her, the proper Southern lady still manages to put on a girdle and look as she is expected to. According to Alexis Brown this utopian woman, “....embraced femininity, beauty, simplicity, and submissiveness; the highest roles to which a southern woman could aspire were those of nurturing mother, dutiful wife, and social moral pillar.” The idea of the seemingly infallible woman pictured by Western civilization is the foundation of this body of work. Through the utilization of watercolor and colored pencil, the drawing method for this series is very controlled and leaves room for few mistakes. Therefore, the very process of making my work resembles the restriction encompassing southern women through the utilization of watercolor and colored pencil. By using watercolor as a preliminary drawing, the roughness of colored pencil is softened. This also allows for definition of specific focal points by using only watercolor in some areas as a fading background to the figure. These two mediums used together create delicate images which flatter the women who are depicted as well as a clear contrast between their perfect appearance and reality. Like the work of Suzanne Heintz, this series of drawings questions the role of women according to the standards of the American norm.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 9:10am - 9:30am
237 Owen Hall

9:20am

Potential Loss Due to Inundation
This project was inspired by the research needs of the Third National Climate Assessment. The NCA3 did a good job at showing the future of our nations climate. However, it needed more information on how exactly our nation will be impacted by climate change. More over how our nation will be impacted economically. When joining spatial and tax data there are GIS processes that can be used to generate summary reports. In doing so the reports generated can be used for a valuation of an industry's assets. Which in this case study is Real Estate and Infrastructure.  As of right now there are many federal initiatives that have been instilled to make sure the United States is ready for the impacts of climate change.  A couple of recent pushes for adapting and mitigating to climate change have been through the White House. These are two Executive Orders that have been passed in recent years: E.O 13653 (2013): Preparing the US for the Impacts of Climate Change and  E.O 13690 (2015): Federal Flood Risk Management Standard The orders provide justification for creating  tools of analysis and visualization of data that in turn will be crucial for educating the public. Knowledge is the key to the progress of our readiness as a nation.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 9:20am - 9:40am
212 Rhoades Robinson Hall

9:20am

Effect of reverting switch II amino acids in Gα13 to their ancestral forms.
Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide binding proteins (G proteins), upon activation by cell surface G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) via external stimuli, transmit signals to downstream pathways regulating a variety of cellular responses, such as cell proliferation and cytoskeletal rearrangements. The G12/13 subfamily of G proteins, consisting of Gα12 and Gα13, has been demonstrated to promote uncontrolled growth of cells and play a role in metastatic cancer progression. Evolutionary comparison of proteins in the G12/13 subfamily of G proteins showed a highly conserved Gln/Gln amino acid pair at a precise structural position in G12/13 proteins in species ranging from sea sponge to humans. Surprisingly, mammalian Gα13 has lost these amino acids and reverted to the Glu/Lys pair common to other G protein subfamilies. To study the effects of this reversion on the ability of Gα13 to bind its effector proteins, we engineered a myc-tagged Gα13 containing a Glu/Lys to Gln/Gln mutation and are testing this in binding assays with a number of proteins that have been shown to interact exclusively with Gα13 or with both Gα12 and Gα13. For this purpose, we constructed several new GST-fusions of Gα13 binding proteins, including Hax-1, JLP, and RGS16. The genes encoding Gα13 binding proteins were isolated from a brain cDNA library, amplified by PCR, and inserted into a vector. The plasmids were transformed into bacterial cells for protein synthesis, and the proteins were purified for ongoing interaction experiments.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 9:20am - 9:40am
014 Zeis Hall

9:20am

Computational Study of Substituent Effect on the Threshold Energy for the 1,2-Interchange of Halogens, Pseudohalogens, and Various R Groups
The possibility of gaseous halocarbons undergoing a 1,2-interchange reaction in competition with typical 1,2-HF or HCl eliminations offers an interesting explanation for their reactivity in the atmosphere. In order to determine the most energetically feasible interchanges, the threshold energies for the interchange of various halogens (F, Cl, Br), pseudohalogens (SH, CH3, NH2, CN, OH, OCH3), and other groups (OCF3, OCH3, CH=CH2, CH2CH3, CH3, CH2OH, C≡CH, CH2CF3, CCl3, CF3) were calculated using computational methods. Ground state and transition state geometries were optimized with the B3PW91 level of theory and 6-311+G(2d,p) basis set. The Br-Br interchange had the lowest E0 (33.8 kcal/mol), and CH3-CH3 had the highest (134.8 kcal/mol). In general, larger atoms/groups with lone pairs of electrons such as halogens, SH, OH, OCH3, and NH2 tend to lower the E0 barrier for interchange, making them the most likely to undergo rearrangement, as their E0 barriers were under 70 kcal/mol. Those groups can be considered for further experimental observation, but CH3 is unlikely to interchange due to its high E0 barriers. C-C≡N bond lengths were considered too long to represent accurate transition states for CN interchange.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 9:20am - 9:40am
123 Zeis Hall

9:20am

Initiation, Cultic Ritual, and Girls’ Foot Races at Artemis Brauronia  
Today, running is considered a purely athletic activity, a test of physical strength, speed, and endurance which is unquestionably secular. For the ancient Greeks, however, running had more complex cultural and religious purposes, even for females. On the surface, given that athletics test physical strength and power, the existence of female athletics in ancient Greece is difficult to conceive, given the nature of Greek society, which promoted the subjection and inherent weakness of women. Yet, pottery shards found at Brauron in Attica depict young girls engaged in what appears to be competitive footraces clad in both short tunics and in the nude. For the ancient Greeks, footraces, erotic pursuits, and ritual were all inextricably linked and represented the taming of a “wild girl” into a marriageable Greek woman. This paper seeks to explore the significance of ancient Greek female athletic activity and its critical relationship with girls’ initiatory rites. As evidence for my claims, I will use contemporaneous textual records and archaeological evidence from the Temple to Artemis at Brauron, an important cultic location for elite Athenian females. Athletics for ancient Greek women were markedly different than the athletic games of their contemporary male counterparts and even further removed from our modern conception of athletics.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 9:20am - 9:40am
406 Wilma Sherrill Center

9:20am

Could It Be You…Spotify? Can Twitter Determine if Recording Artists Support Streaming Music?
Last year streaming music had overtaken MP3 downloads for the first time, and while music fans love it, a few major artists have been vocal in their opposition. One notable artist was Taylor Swift, who not only refused to release her latest album on Spotify in November 2014, but also removed her entire back catalog off the service, calling the service a “grand experiment.” Therefore music industry pundits want to gauge artist sentiment regarding streaming music and determine how many artists accept or reject the streaming music business model. This project utilized common web development technologies, (e.g. JavaScript, JSON, JQuery, HTML, and CSS); to produce a Twitter-based web application that tracked certain key words and followed major and independent artists on social media. The application recorded the tweets in a database which made it possible to produce meaningful sentiment analysis.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 9:20am - 9:40am
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

9:20am

Transaction Cost Economics: Determining Governance Structure in the Market for Live Music
This paper looks at how transaction cost economics can be useful in determining whether the market for live music in a small city in Western North Carolina is classical, neoclassical, or relational. Seven individuals were interviewed to see how musicians, sound companies, venue owners, and event promoters interact within the market. An adaptation of Thomas Palay’s model for determining governance structure is used to assess the five aspects of governance within the market. The results of the model are then compared to Oliver Williamson’s definitions of governance structures as derived from the works of Ronald Coase. Following these guidelines, we can determine that the governance structure for this market is highly relational. While interviews were being conducted, five out of the seven participants began to question the method by which they have organized their business and wondered whether a switch to formal contracting would be made easier. All names, of both people and companies, have been changed in order to protect the reputations of those interviewed.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 9:20am - 9:40am
016 Karpen Hall

9:20am

“Warm & Chill” – A social media analysis of how WNC magazine, the Asheville Citizen-Times, and the Mountain Xpress feed into and off of one of the popular local hashthags, #WNC
This study demonstrates how one hashtag, #WNC, provides a level of online engagement for three publications: WNC magazine, the Asheville Citizen-Times, and the Mountain Xpress. This paper will analyze the top social media influencers on the hashtag stream for these publications, and the way in which follower interaction dictates the types of posts released by the three publications. Due to the current nature of journalism, it is more imperative than ever before to be engaged with social media and to be aware of the role social media play in engaging a publication’s target audience. By following the hashstream #WNC (or #wnc) over four weeks, this study will bring a more centralized lens to the usage of social media in journalism and the publication field.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 9:20am - 9:40am
012 Karpen Hall

9:20am

Mindfulness as an Intervention for Math Anxiety
Math anxiety is common in school settings and poses a threat to attitudes toward math-based classes. Because mindfulness-based interventions have been shown to decrease general anxiety and improve well-being, this study sought to explore the impact of brief mindfulness exercises on math anxiety. Participants were 22 students enrolled in two sections of a math-based research methods class in psychology. One section of the course, with 14 students, was designated as the mindfulness (experimental) group, and the other section, with 8 students, was designated as the comparison group. All participants were given a survey at the beginning of the study in order to assess baseline levels of math anxiety. Students in the experimental group then participated in mindfulness exercises (e.g., deep breathing, body meditation) at the beginning of the next six classes. Participants in both groups completed the math anxiety survey a second time at the end of the intervention, and scores on the class’s first exam were also recorded. Math anxiety levels among students in the experimental group will be compared across the two time periods in order to determine whether the mindfulness exercises had an impact. In addition, anxiety levels between students in the experimental and comparison group will be compared. Mindfulness exercises, should they be found to be effective, are easy to implement in classroom situations and could be a helpful tool in lessening math anxiety.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 9:20am - 9:40am
407 Wilma Sherrill Center

9:20am

Women’s Empowerment Through the Lyrics of Female Country Musicians
Contemporary country music is not widely known for its subversion of traditional gender roles. On the contrary, country music is often seen as upholding stereotypes of southern culture, with particular focus on traditional displays of masculinity and femininity. Scholars argue that country music does continually reify notions of the gender binary, in which men and women are separate, and strictly so. Based on the stringent enforcement of the gender binary in country music, this paper will explore aspects of country music that are misogynistic, tinted with characteristics of hegemonic masculinity and the subordination and oppression of women. While these characteristics are undoubtedly relevant to an understanding of how country music polices gender, this paper will also explore the extent to which female country musicians, such as Carrie Underwood, Miranda Lambert and the Dixie Chicks, are writing music for women’s empowerment. Some posit that female country artists, while seeking to empower themselves and their audiences, covertly reinforce notions of traditional gender roles and feminine stereotypes within the country music scene. However, this paper will argue that, despite overtones of misogyny and women’s oppression, female artists seek to break the mold of hegemonic masculinity to empower female audiences through the reclamation of power and agency. To discern empowerment in the genre this paper will analyze the specific lyrics of songs by Carrie Underwood, Miranda Lambert and the Dixie Chicks. These lyrics, used as primary source material, will respond to the scholarly arguments that argue that female country articles are not transgressive.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 9:20am - 9:40am
246 Zageir Hall

9:20am

‘Smart’ Inverter System for Power Generation Transient Damping
The United States of America is faced with a challenging issue, particularly in states with increasing percentages of electrical power generation due to solar photovoltaic (PV) power. Distributed solar power usage is spreading. The demand for electricity during the daylight hours in many western states may soon be nearly met by PV generation alone. This will necessitate idling or shutting down conventional steam turbine generators on a daily basis, which has a deleterious effect on such equipment. The steep ramp rate (over 4000MW per hour) in the power demand curve in the evening when solar power is waning but overall electrical demand is rising will soon require the frequent cycling of expensive to operate rapid-response power plants (Farrell). These scenarios would result in an increase in the cost of operation, and therefore an increase in the cost of conventional electricity at the consumer level (Shamoradi, Mohammadi, Kahkesh). For this reason, solar energy has become a technical problem for electrical utilities.To address this issue, a small scale control system was designed and implemented that stores energy during times of potential overproduction and automatically resupplies that energy back to the power grid during times of high demand. This flattens the real demand curve at the generator output. On a larger scale, this could allow conventional power generation equipment to be operated within design parameters more consistently, which keeps the operating costs of the electric company low. Additionally, the Smart Inverter system assists the turbine generators by inherently providing stable frequency control. The Smart Inverter is able to effectively meter supplementary power to and from a miniature power grid in order to damp the power demand curve of the generator. This is important to ensure that the increasing use of solar energy does not drive up the cost of conventional generation. The Smart Inverter can help to ensure system reliability under changing grid conditions as the nation begins to rely more heavily on renewable sources of energy.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 9:20am - 10:00am
213 Rhoades Robinson Hall

9:30am

A Wider Perspective on People
Environmental portraits and panoramic photography have existed for decades, but rarely have been used in combination. This project employs both techniques to produce ultrawide-perspective images of people in typical, everyday settings that illuminate some important aspect of their lives. Each digital image is stitched together from dozens of photos into one, multi-gigabyte panorama.  The image tells its story through human interaction with meaningful objects that share the space.  This work pulls together themes and techniques from many great photographers, including the intentionality of Arnold Newman and Wes Anderson, the thought-out narratives of David Hilliard, the drama and humanity of Edward Steichen's Family of Man exhibition, and Elliott Erwitt's instinctual observation of the “typical."

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 9:30am - 9:50am
237 Owen Hall

9:40am

Characterization of Genetic Diversity in Demes of Purple Pitcher Plants (Sarracenia purpurea L.) from Western North Carolina
Purple pitcher plant (Sarracenia purpurea L.) is a carnivorous species that is widespread throughout the coastal plain of eastern North America. In western North Carolina, S. purpurea var. montana (mountain purple pitcher plant) exhibits a much more limited distribution and is found only in isolated montane bogs and fens, which serve as ecosystem islands. Population sizes in mountain bogs are fairly small, ranging from as few as 2 up to approximately 300 individuals. In addition, many bogs are spatially isolated, with S. purpurea var. montana located up to 14 km from the next known population. We worked to characterize the genetic structure of eight S. purpurea var. montana demes in Western North Carolina using microsatellite loci. DNA was extracted from leaf tissue using Qiagen kits, and 5 microsatellite primer sets were used to amplify polymorphic regions of the genome. PCR products were run through agarose gel electrophoresis to visualize and quantify band sizes. Data from this project will help the United States Fish and Wildlife Service determine S. purpurea var. montana’s suitability as a candidate species for conservation and preservation programs.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 9:40am - 10:00am
014 Zeis Hall

9:40am

Synthetic Strategies Towards Indole Analogues of a Tamoxifen® Metabolite
The target indole analogue of 4-hydroxy Tamoxifen® is of interest due to its theoretically increased affinity for the estrogen receptor relative to the popular breast cancer treatment, Tamoxifen®. The Hemetsberger-Knittel indole synthesis methodology has been proven to be an effective and efficient procedure to synthesize substituted indoles from vinyl azides. The use of substituted benzophenones in producing vinyl azides would provide an efficient route to aryl substituted indoles and the series of indole analogues of 4-hydroxy Tamoxifen® desired in this project. Unfortunately, the low reactivity and greater steric hindrance of benzophenone compared to benzaldehydes hindered this process. The Hemetsberger-Knittel indole methodology was then employed to generate the desired methoxyindole core followed by bromination at the 3-position of the indole. This allows for the addition of the aryl group via a Sonogashira coupling. The alternative but effective route will be discussed along with the progress toward an indole analogue of Tamoxifen®.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 9:40am - 10:00am
123 Zeis Hall

9:40am

Embodying the Dead: Ancestor Masks and Worship in Aristocratic Roman Funerals
Aristocratic funerals in Rome were highly ritualized and interactive processions that celebrated the life of the deceased and his predecessors. By law and tradition, the men of the elite families would pass on wax portrait masks of their ancestors known as imagines, which were worn by actors portraying the dead during the funeral parade. These funerary masks were used as transformative objects of embodying the spirits of the dead. Not only did the actors adopt the likeness of the deceased, they wore his clothes, and took on mannerisms and personality traits known to the individual. Using anthropological theory on masks and sources written during the Republic and Empire, the goal of this presentation is to demonstrate how the Romans hired actors to not only portray the dead but to literally embody their ancestors in a performative, “magical,” and religious ritual that went beyond the enforcement of social hierarchy in Rome

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 9:40am - 10:00am
406 Wilma Sherrill Center

9:40am

Wanna Know All Things Pokèmon: The Interactive Pokèdex
A Pokédex is an encyclopedia of all the creatures in Pokémon, the collection of anime characters in the video and trading card games first released in 1996. Unfortunately, the Pokédex within the games is incomplete, thus players refer to websites that offer the additional information in a table or spreadsheet-like format. The user experience when using the Pokédex websites is neither interactive nor visually appealing. This project created an interactive, intuitively usable, and visually appealing website with an underlying database that feels like an extension of the Pokémon game.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 9:40am - 10:00am
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

9:40am

Asheville Walkability Analysis: A Hedonic Pricing Model
Given that numerous studies have shown the social and health benefits of walking, it makes sense for walkable locations to be more desirable. One way of measuring a location’s walkability is by its Walk Score, a numerical value generated by a website of the same name. Walk Score uses a rating system from 0 to 100 where higher scores denote a more walkable location. This study generates a hedonic pricing model for houses in Asheville with Walk Score as a potential factor. The major finding of this study is the impact that walkability, as interpreted through Walk Score, has on property values in Asheville.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 9:40am - 10:00am
016 Karpen Hall

9:40am

Social Media Analysis of Chapel Hill Shooting
This study is a content analysis of social media discussion surrounding the Chapel Hill shooting of three Muslim-American students. It will focus on how and how well Twitter was used to communicate information to students after the shooting. It will also focus on how, how often, and for how long, within the time of the study, the hashtags #MuslimLivesMatter and #ChapelHillShooting were used. Also, it will look at how the above hashtags connected the incident with other similar and non-similar hashtags and keywords about other events following he shooting. Data were collected for the above hashstreams over six weeks using Twitter analytics and HootSuite Pro, online social media analytic tools. The study broadens the understanding of how social media analytics influence knowledge of events and influence of social media on the public related to the study.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 9:40am - 10:00am
012 Karpen Hall

9:40am

“How Appalachian Women’s Voices Have Been Rendered Silent in Correctional Institutions”
This paper examines the stories of recently incarcerated women from Buncombe County, NC and Letcher County, KY. As national rates of incarceration continue to rise, the discourse on incarceration remains narrowly focused upon urban men. Media outlets often report on stories that support common stereotypes about urban men and crime while ignoring the economic and social factors that contribute to criminal behavior for people of all genders. It remains true that men are incarcerated at a tremendous rate. However, according to a Bureau of Justice Statistics report published in 2013, women nationally are jailed at a rate that has more than doubled that of men in the last two decades. Incarcerated Appalachian women often have histories of mental illness, violence, and substance abuse. Economic conditions in rural areas often force women to pursue “survival crime” as a means of subsistence when no other avenues of support are available. There are few programs designed to assist women upon release from jail and those that exist are often very limited. Continual erasure by the media and intervention programs has resulted in marginalization of incarcerated women from rural areas. Central Appalachian women need a forum to speak about their communities and the intersectional systems that have affected their lives after jail. As their stories remain untold, effective intervention methods remain underdeveloped. Providing an outlet for women’s voices is a crucial first step to understanding the needs of women who are at greatest risk for criminal behavior and subsequent erasure.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 9:40am - 10:00am
246 Zageir Hall

9:50am

Perpetual Pursuit: Painting the Unattainable
Perpetual Pursuit: Painting the Unattainable investigates the aspiration to access an unreachable landscape. This body of work deals with ambition in both process and content, utilizing artists’ materials and a visual vocabulary to reference pursuit. In the context of this research, ambition represents endless reaching; the tendency to idealize what is physically and immaterially remote; and the aspiration to close the gap between the near and the far. James Elkins’ What Painting Is outlines a distinct relationship between the painting practice and the pursuit of an unknown outcome. Artistic waste, such as leftover oil and acrylic scraps, serves as evidence of this process. Additionally, this body of work uses staircases, windows, and the color blue to reference elusive distances. The color blue draws upon the writings of Rebecca Solnit, associating it with the tendency to idealize what is far away. For this reason, various shades of blue are evident throughout Perpetual Pursuit. Staircases function as a symbol for endless climbing; they are the means to access elevated spaces. Windows serve as another architectural device: framing the unattainable, they act as visual abbreviations of longing. Influences include contemporary artists who reference abstraction and architecture such as James Turrell, Richard Jacobs, and M.C. Escher. James Hyde’s and Robert Rauschenberg’s use of unconventional materials as well as their combination of painting and sculpture also informs this series. Perpetual Pursuit: Painting the Unattainable seeks satisfaction in the act of pursuing.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 9:50am - 10:10am
237 Owen Hall

10:00am

Solar Tracking System
A fully automated solar tracking system for industrial and domestic application was constructed and tested.  The system uses GPS data and an array of sensors to track the sun’s azimuth and inclination angles, and to point a parabolic dish toward the sun. The goal for this project was to position the dish to within 0.25 degrees of the sun’s azimuth and inclination angles, and to keep it within that range continuously throughout a 6 hour period.  This system has applications in the fields of energy collection, solar heating, and astronomical tracking.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 10:00am - 10:40am
213 Rhoades Robinson Hall

10:05am

Using molecular genetics to determine the relatedness of two river otters (Lontra canadensis), with implications for breeding and conservation
The river otter species, Lontra canadensis, was considered endangered in North Carolina until 2008. These otters are now part of a captive breeding program aimed at supplementing rivers with low populations. Because of the limited number of individuals in wild populations, the maintenance of genetic diversity must be an important consideration for those undertaking conservation efforts. The Western North Carolina Nature Center in Asheville, NC has two otters that they believe are unrelated enough to breed according the Species Conservation Act. The objective of this project was to determine the relatedness of these two individuals and establish their breeding suitability. DNA was extracted from fecal samples, and PCR was used to amplify five specific genetic loci. The PCR products were run on 3% agarose gel, and the coefficient of relatedness (R) was calculated. The coefficient of relatedness was used to determine whether or not the otters are unrelated enough to breed according to the WNC Nature Center’s guidelines. If sufficient measures are not taken to avoid inbreeding of closely related individuals, the breeding of captive river otters in order to introduce offspring into wild populations could have a detrimental impact on the genetic diversity of future populations. Therefore, the results of this project have important evolutionary implications for river otter conservation.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 10:05am - 10:25am
014 Zeis Hall

10:05am

An Ethnochemical Analysis: Red Glass Beads from the Eastern Region of Ghana
Using a variety of spectroscopic methods, elemental components and coloring agents in recycled translucent red glass beads and red powdered glass beads from the Eastern Region of Ghana were investigated. Beads are central to Ghanaian culture relating messages of ancestral roots, social stature, and even emotion. The evolution of bead-making in Ghana was evaluated from an ethnochemical perspective by interviewing a series of experts, examining and collecting glass materials, and recording the conditions under which the beads were produced. Cadmium sulfur/selenium compounds were prominently used in the industrial manufacturing of red glass; however, they have been outlawed in most countries during the last three decades due to their high toxicity to humans and the environment. Conversely, the traditional red glass colorants, copper and gold are safe for human use; but, they are more expensive and require extensive, accurate heating processes, making them inconvenient for mass production. Combination of spectroscopic methods allowed for extensive qualitative and some quantitative analysis of the network formers, modifiers, and colorants used in red glass beads from Ghana. Instrumental methods include: powder X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (PXD), atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS), and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX). High resolution imaging on the SEM allowed for extensive analysis of furnace conditions and structural information regarding the bead’s surface.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 10:05am - 10:25am
123 Zeis Hall

10:05am

Observa: Bringing the Broadcaster to the Modern Internet
As online experiences have become more media-rich, the strict line of “content creator” and “consumer” has blurred. More than ever, Internet users have turned to a third mode of media participant, the “curator”. Many of the content production and promotion platforms that exist on the Internet, such as social media platforms, facilitate the uses of the consumer and the creator, but not the curator. Utilizing Node.js and it’s family of web technologies and state-of-the-art video processing tools tools like ffmpeg, this project has implemented a customizable, configurable Internet video broadcast system. Users can mix in and out video and other content from a variety of platforms, as well as their own webcam, to as many or as few users as desired. The project has been coupled with a simple plugin system which allows users to connect platforms such as YouTube as video sources. A plugin specification was also created which allows users to write their own plugins and extend the project as they see fit.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 10:05am - 10:25am
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

10:05am

Valuing Creeks on Residential Property through Hedonic Price Analysis
This study uses Hedonic price theory and multiple regression to measure the effect of proximity to a creek or stream on the sale price of single family homes in the Asheville area, all else equal. GIS spatial analytics are used to process data for variables with a geographic component. Multiple regression shows the effect and significance of each variable on sale price holding all others constant. Presence of a water feature is expected to have a positive effect on sale price, given that it does not significantly increase flood risk.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 10:05am - 10:25am
016 Karpen Hall

10:05am

Criticism on Canvas – Baudelaire’s Critic as Painter of Modern Life
Oscar Wilde once said concerning the art of the critic versus that of the artist: “It is very much more difficult to talk about a thing than to do it ... Anybody can make history. Only a great man can write it.” While Wilde’s exaltation of the critic may seem to belittle the artist, it nevertheless reveals a larger debate concerning the purpose of art criticism and its viability as an art form. Through his famous essay on the street artist and reporter Constantin Guys, “The Painter of Modern Life,” Charles Baudelaire reveals a similar view concerning the relationship between the art critic and the artist. Baudelaire not only elevates the critic to the position of an artist, but to the position of the penultimate artist – the Painter of Modern Life, one who captures the “eternal and transitory,” the “absolute and particular” beauty of his epoch.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 10:05am - 10:25am
406 Wilma Sherrill Center

10:05am

The Avengers; the Age of Ultron
Beginning Sunday, Mar 1 and lasting through Apr 5, a total of five weeks, I have been, and continue to, analyze the The Avengers: The Age of Ultron movie release campaign. Only two weeks into the analysis it is difficult to explain what my research will determine in the end. Overall there is a very positive sentiment, that I have gathered using Twitter Analytics and HootSuite University but, as aforementioned, it is difficult to completely put my findings together until I see the final analysis. Some influencing voices on Twitter include Marvel, Sony and ComicBookMovie.com. These three organizations have had some of the most powerful voices on social media in the film industry this year. The new Avengers movie is everywhere and a very large percentage of fans are excited and continue to spread the word of the films growing popularity. From online countdowns to the movie's release, to hosting marathons in movie theaters and private venues throughout the nation to catch-up or re-watch the series, the Age of Ultron may turn out to be one of the most successful film campaigns of 2015. When my research is complete I hope to have a better understanding of how a successful film release campaign works and what separated this film's success from others.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 10:05am - 10:25am
012 Karpen Hall

10:05am

They Also Had Dreams: How Black Women in Post-WWII Durham Embodied the Civil Rights Struggles
Troubling depictions persist in historical examinations of Black women. More specifically, the civil rights movement narratives as seen on film, in academic textbooks, and through written accounts, paint a picture where women are typically in the background as the wife or family member of more famous male leaders. Stereotypes of Black women as the doting domestic servant pervade popular culture, and historians’ concerns with the activist accomplishments of men overshadow the everyday triumphs for Black women. What’s more, feminist discussions often exclude issues specific to Black women. Fortunately, now historians and other feminist activists are uncovering female voices, showing that Black women resisted, marched, and organized with the best of them. Taking Durham from WW II into the present as a test subject, this paper will examine how a diverse economic climate and a powerful Black community, despite segregationist laws, placed Black women in positions of power to affect change within everyday Black spaces. By examining local institutions and how they shaped the landscape so that Blacks could flourish in a segregated South, Black feminist theory provides evidence that the gendered spaces of Jim Crow produced networks and alliances in the homes, the classroom, and educational organizations that were just as important as the marches where the whole world was watching.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 10:05am - 10:25am
246 Zageir Hall

10:15am

Challenging the Feminine: Gender Tropes in Classical Painting
In much of art history, women are depicted as innately helpless, weak and even unwittingly malevolent. Conversely, many paintings affirm the virility, dominance, and general wisdom of men. Challenging The Feminine: Gender Standardization in Classical Painting identifies three archetypal depictions of females: the reclining female, the female aspect, and the grouped female. Several iconic works of art history are referenced, such as Titian’s Venus of Urbino, Edgar Degas’ Bath Paintings, and Raphael’s Three Graces. Accompanying the research, the artist has produced a series of large-scale oil paintings exploring depictions of gender. The use of classical figurative poses creates parallels between gender within contemporary art and the antiquated preconceptions of female agency. The artist also uses facial expressions and body language to communicate each painted figure’s personality and experience. Much like the duality of male and female, the Vanitas genre effectively communicates binary ideas. Relevant contemporary artists such as Jenny Saville, Beverly McIver, and Lizz Andronaco inform this discussion about the portrayal of women in contemporary painting. This body of work contextualizes and questions the conventions of feminine tropes in art history by utilizing the same classical canons that propagated them.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 10:15am - 10:35am
237 Owen Hall

10:25am

Identification of Gray Wolf (Canis lupus) Cubs’ Ancestral Geographic Origin Using Mitochondrial DNA Analysis
Canis lupus, the gray wolf, is a highly adaptable species found in zoos and nature centers across the United States. Though Canis lupus once thrived throughout Asia, Europe, and North America, it was rapidly over-hunted and by the late 1970s, was reclassified as endangered. This mandated its increased regulation and protection. The Western North Carolina Nature Center in Asheville, NC has two Canis lupus cubs whose grandparents are of unknown geographic origin. Their animal curator hopes to determine if their grandparents came from North America, as this will require a higher protection status and increased regulation (such as experimental populations and controlled geographic regions, among many others) of the cubs. To test this, fur samples were collected from both cubs, and DNA was extracted. Primers (ATP8-1F, ATP8-2R, ATP-8-lupus-F) which can differentiate between Old World and New World Canis lupus subspecies were used to amplify a region of the wolves’ mitochondrial DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The MT-ATP8 gene will be sequenced and compared to previously identified sequences of this gene in other Canis lupus subspecies via a GenBank® Blast. This comparative analysis will determine the origin of the grandparents, which in turn will allow the WNC-NC to take the appropriate conservation steps for the Canis lupus cubs.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 10:25am - 10:45am
014 Zeis Hall

10:25am

CASSCF studies of 1,1-HF and 1,1-HCl elimination transition state geometries of haloalkanes
Elimination reactions are a possible degradation pathway of haloalkanes during their destruction in high temperature environments. Elimination reactions occur in two different pathways: a 1,2 elimination where a halogen and a hydrogen are eliminated from two different carbon atoms, or a 1,1 elimination where a halogen and a hydrogen are eliminated from the same carbon atoms. The highly multireference character of the 1,1 eliminations make it difficult to study these reactions using conventional DFT calculations, therefore the CASSCF level of theory is utilized to optimize two propane molecules, 1,1 dichloro and 1,1 difluoropropane. Results are presented as transition state geometries with consideration of the optimum active space for generating reliable geometries and vibrational frequencies, and found that the 1,1 difluoropropane 1,1 HF elimination pathway had a threshold energy of 70.1 kcal/mol and matches with experimental data. However, the 1,1 HCl elimination transition state geometry from 1,1 dichloropropane produced a threshold energy of 121.6 kcal/mol which is too high of an energy for this reaction to take place. The 1,1 HCl elimination pathway has been studied more extensively by including chloroform HCl elimination and 1,1 dichloroethane 1,1 HCl elimination. More research is being done in order to find a more reasonable transition state for 1,1 dichloropropane.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 10:25am - 10:45am
123 Zeis Hall

10:25am

From Paper to Cloud: Updating the UNC Asheville Academic Policies Committee’s System
Businesses utilize the Internet and web technology in order to make the use of their products simpler, more accessible, and better organized. For similar reasons, UNC Asheville’s Academic Policies Committee (APC) wanted to convert their legacy system of creating new classes and modifying existing ones from paper to a web-based system. Using the Drupal Content Management System (CMS), this project fulfills the APC’s requirements by creating a web application and its underlying database.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 10:25am - 10:45am
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

10:25am

Estimating the Demand for Gasoline: An econometric Approach
Demand curves are an important aspect of market equilibrium analysis, and important to understanding how consumers make certain purchase decisions based on price. Modeling the demand for gasoline in the US will give insights on demand for a good that nearly all Americans consume, and show how American consumers change their demand for gasoline in response to price and other factors. Using econometric analysis, this project creates a demand curve for gasoline that predicts the quantity demanded for gasoline in the United States at every price level. This paper will go beyond traditional models of demand that include only real price and real income as affecting quantity demanded by considering relevant factors specific to gasoline that will affect consumer demand. By doing so, these factors, which are often considered in the background of market analysis for goods, can be examined, resulting in a better explanation of why Americans consume the amounts of gasoline that they do. The results of this study will allow for the impact of each variable affecting demand to be gauged, and for predictions about future gasoline prices under varying conditions to be made.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 10:25am - 10:45am
016 Karpen Hall

10:25am

Hausbesetzung: The Squatters’ Movement in Germany
To squat means to illegally occupy a building or piece of land. The motivations behind squatting range from political protest to poverty and unaffordable rent. The German word for squatting is “Hausbesetzung”, which literally means “house occupying”. In my research, I examine the history of the squatters’ movement in Germany with a focus in Berlin. The movement gained popularity in the late 1970s and 1980s and exploded after the fall of the Berlin Wall. This was caused partially because of the large amount of abandoned homes in the East of people who fled to the West, but also because the uncertain legal situation allowed others to easily occupy those abandoned homes and eventually gain legal rights to them. Squatting in Germany is mainstream enough to have its own vocabulary, such as “Wagenplatz”, a type of squat where people build or convert vehicles into livable spaces and congregate in an otherwise unused space. Squatting is an everyday phenomenon, and even has a place in pop culture. Many squats have gained legal status, and many are also community and art spaces. The purpose of my research is to raise awareness of this movement to an American audience, since it is largely unheard of in the United States due to the language barrier. I also would like to raise the question of why squatting is so unheard of in the United States in the first place.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 10:25am - 10:45am
406 Wilma Sherrill Center

10:25am

Taking Sides on Neutrality: An Exploration of Net Neutrality Through Its Effects on Social Media
This study is an analysis of the issue of net neutrality and how it has affected political, social and cultural landscapes as seen through various social media platforms. This research seeks to understand how various generations and class ranges respond to the issue on these platforms, as well as how vocal the different social groups are respectively. The research also seeks to understand which platforms are more indicative of a pro or anti-net neutrality stance, and why this might be the case. Research was gathered over the course of six weeks through a look at online forums such as Reddit, as well as other social media analytic tools like Google Social Analytics and HootSuite Pro for aggregation of discussions on the topic of net neutrality. Ultimately, this study will determine how social media can point to distinct social groups and their individual reactions to such a hot-button issue as net neutrality, allowing for a further understanding of opinions.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 10:25am - 10:45am
012 Karpen Hall

10:25am

Preventing Sexual Violence at UNCA: A Survivor’s Perspective
Sexual assault and rape on college campuses is garnering increasing coverage in the media. In April 2014, President Barack Obama created the White House Task Force to Protect Students From Sexual Assault; national awareness of this insidious problem is rapidly expanding. However, there are still rampant violations of Title IX legislation occurring at colleges and universities across the nation. According to the university website, UNC Asheville “believes that health education and promotion are important to the learning outcomes for all students.” This paper argues that, as part of this initiative, it is the university’s obligation to make its policy regarding strict Title IX enforcement better as well as to enhance Haven, the compulsory online education system for ameliorating students’ awareness of sexual assault and rape. In order for UNC Asheville to truly ensure the health and safety of its students, it is imperative to improve education, visibility, and resources related to the prevention of sexual violence on the campus. Using scholarly research in conjunction with subjective experience of a survivor of rape on three different college campuses along the east coast, the paper outlines necessary changes to UNC Asheville’s existing policies related to sexual violence education as well as legislation and protocol for reporting sexual assault.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 10:25am - 10:45am
246 Zageir Hall

10:30am

Butchered to Make an Austrian Holiday: Morality vs. the Crowd and How Never the Twain Shall Meet
The Moral Sense, that affliction which gives us the ability to tell right from wrong, is not a virtue, but our greatest curse according to Mark Twain. In The Mysterious Stranger, he creates a village asleep in 16th century Austria not unlike St. Petersburg in Huck Finn or Camelot in A Connecticut Yankee, but this time the moral voice is not found in a time traveler or a young boy raised on the fringes of civilization. This time, Twain admits defeat and realizes there are no truly moral humans in his story, so he introduces us to an unfallen angel with the surname of Satan, born without the Moral Sense. This freedom of choice, this knowledge of good and evil is wholly absent in the animal kingdom, and much the better they are for it. They are innocent of pogroms, lynch mobs, and witch burnings, but according to human doctrine, it is they who are excluded from heaven. Twain has told us throughout his body of work that life is lived more freely and harmoniously in nature, and your morals and character degrade when you are a member of the group. I will argue that this makes him an unwitting transcendentalist. Where Huck was able to see the inherent sin of slavery in antebellum Missouri because he connected to nature separate from the community, Theodor shares in the collective guilt of his community due to his immersion in it.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 10:30am - 10:50am
038 Karpen Hall

10:35am

Art, Not Art: An Exploration of the Communicative Properties of Photography in Regards to Social Change
This research looks at photography as a mode of social activism in light of the “art versus document” debate. As opposed to examining which type of photography is “better,” this paper explores how pictorialists versus photojournalists communicate. While documentary photography (photojournalism) seems to purport reality, there are many ways images can be manipulated. And although fine art photography appears to convey tropes in a visually evocative manner, it is not fully organic. Instead, both categories use techniques of the “other side.” As such, we find that perhaps there is a fundamental problem with the debate; that is describes what Edward Steichen labels a “false dichotomy.” Rather, photography as a whole is a medium separate (because of its inclusiveness) from both documents and art. Using this new categorization of photography (thus its communicative properties) we can explore how to use photography as an instrument for change in a globalized yet polarized world.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 10:35am - 10:55am
237 Owen Hall

10:45am

Chromosomal sex determination of barn and screech owls from the Western North Carolina Nature Center
Owls generally exhibit little sexual dimorphism: therefore, sex determination often requires analysis beyond morphological differences. The staff of the Western North Carolina Nature Center in Asheville, NC is currently debating the sexes of two barn owls, Tyto alba, and one screech owl, Megascops asio, after discovering eggs in an enclosure thought to have only contained males.  In this study, total genomic DNA was extracted from feathers sampled from each of these birds and amplified with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using P2 and P8 primers to amplify the CHD1 gene, which is used to determine sex. The DNA product was concentrated and run through 2.5% agarose gel electrophoresis, sequenced, and then examined to determine chromosomal sex. Individuals corresponding to single (ZZ) bands were confirmed to be male, while those exhibiting double (ZW) bands were determined to be female.  Sex determination is an important component in the conservation and development of breeding programs for many bird species. Efficient procedures for examining chromosomal DNA in monomorphic species, such as these owls, could therefore be vital to further studies.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 10:45am - 11:05am
014 Zeis Hall

10:45am

Hydrogeochemistry of Kanuga Fen
Kanuga fen, located outside of Hendersonville, NC, is rare type of wetland found in the Appalachian Mountains. It is inhabited by two federally protected species, Clemmys muhlenbergii and Sarracenia rubra subsp. jonesii. This study examined the water chemistry of samples collected from various sites of the fen during the summer, fall, and winter seasons. Major ions were quantified using ion chromatography and alkalinity titrations then plotted on Piper and Stiff diagrams for data comparison. Samples from the summer and fall seasons were found to be similar as they were slightly acidic (pH of 5.7-6.5), very dilute, and mainly composed of Na+ and HCO3- ions. Data from all three season will be examined collectively and compared with literature values of similar habitats to identify possible trends. However, the influence of the water chemistry on these species’ preferences has yet to be determined.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 10:45am - 11:05am
123 Zeis Hall

10:45am

Pacman Goes Nom-Nom-Nom
The most popular video games are not always the most expensive ones. Gamers continue to enjoy playing the original Pacman arcade game. The player assumes the role of Pacman and races to collect all of the yellow dots on the map without getting caught by one of four ghosts chasing after him. But, how would the experience change for players if the game were to be played from the perspective of one of the ghosts? This project demonstrates this viewpoint swap. By developing and testing a new version of Pacman in which the player is one of the ghosts chasing Pacman through a 3-dimensional map with a first person point of view. This project used Blender and Unity to create a functional and fun gaming experience.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 10:45am - 11:05am
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

10:45am

Liquidity Trap and Quantitative Easing: Adapting the ISLM
The burst of the real estate bubble and subsequent financial crisis that began in the US in 2008 prompted the Federal Reserve’s Open Market Committee (FOMC) to reduce the target for the Federal Funds Rate to nearly zero in order to keep banks liquid and stave off a severe financial crisis. However, loosening of monetary policy via the Federal Funds Rate is ineffective beyond this zero bound, as nominal interest rates cannot be negative. In order to prevent a severe recession or depression, the Federal Reserve turned to unconventional monetary policy to influence macroeconomic conditions via a regime of asset purchases to reduce long term interest rates. Traditionally, the Investment/Savings Liquidity Model (ISLM), developed by John Hicks in 1937, provides suggestions as to where the equilibrium for the money market lies with regards to the supply of money, represented by the LM curve, and the expected interest rate, dictated by the investment/savings curve which shapes demand. However, as the interest rate approaches zero, the traditional model loses efficacy in describing the interrelations of the aforementioned factors, thus necessitating a reexamination of the model. Here, we intend to adapt the ISLM model to accurately describe the liquidity trap that exists when nominal interest rates reach the zero lower bound, as well as how unconventional monetary policy measures can be represented in the ISLM using Japan and the United States as case studies.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 10:45am - 11:05am
016 Karpen Hall

10:45am

The Monster in All of Us: Towards a Reapproximation of Goya’s los Caprichos
Since Francisco Goya first released his collection of 80 stone engravings entitles los Caprichos in 1799, they have remained a topic of curiosity and debate. Overwhelmingly, the expert interpretations available examine los Caprichos strictly in terms of the external circumstances in which it was created – the political climate of 18th century Spain, the rise of the Enlightenment period, the deteriorating mental health of the artist. The research being presented here will propose a different methodology in approaching and understanding Goya’s work that emphasizes the role the spectator has in creating meaning. By encouraging the audience to interact individually with the internal components of the artwork, as opposed to restricting it to a predetermined lens of historical context, novel interpretations of long-established work are able to develop. As part of this research, the contemporary art perspective of Monster Theory was applied to los Caprichos in order to create an example of how the spectator-driven-meaning methodology could be enacted. This hypothetical application garnered a variety of interpretations unique to the spectator that emphasized internal, aesthetic ambiguities.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 10:45am - 11:05am
406 Wilma Sherrill Center

10:45am

Social Media Patterns: School Shootings and Twitter
This study will discuss social media commentary following the tragic deaths of Razan Abu Salha, Yusor Abu Salha and Deah Shaddy Barakat on Twitter and Facebook, presently the two most popular social media platforms. After the tragic shooting of three University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill students, the news media and social media started buzzing. As a news story breaks, social media –namely Twitter – are the first sources for on the scene updates for journalists. Tracking keywords, hastags and social media influencers, data were collected for the hash streams #Muslimlivesmatter and #ChapelHillShooting over five weeks using Twitter analytics and HootSuite, along with other online social media analytic tools. This study expands upon existing literature about how people utilize social media to respond to tragic, breaking news events.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 10:45am - 11:05am
012 Karpen Hall

10:45am

Tikkun Olam, Feminism, and Social Justice: The Stories of Jewish Women in Asheville
Jews in America occupy an interesting position as neither being fully integrated nor fully excluded from mainstream culture. While being Jewish can be considered an ethnicity and religion, it is not often considered a race. Although Jews have been persecuted in the past, most recently during the Holocaust, as a group they are often successful and more prosperous than other minorities. The measure of oppression in terms of material wealth and socio-economic status marginalizes Jews from dialogues about oppression. This paper explores how Jewish women’s understanding of their cultural, religious, ethnic, and gender identities influence their understanding of themselves in American society. An importance is placed on practicing social justice through the value of tikkun olam. Jewish women, who face prejudice and oppression for their multiple layers of identity, are more likely to pursue tikkun olam through their work and in their personal lives. This paper demonstrates how intersectional identities and social justice are linked. These people, who are women and Jewish, incorporate the broader Jewish experience into their own personal beliefs of social justice, and some incorporate beliefs about social justice into their Jewish experience. Their intersecting identities as women and as Jews give them a unique understanding of oppression and their role in social justice. Personal narrative is used to explore this question of identity and social justice. Over a period of four months, Jewish women in Asheville were interviewed. This paper concludes that participants’ Jewish and identities as women influence their understanding of oppression and social justice.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 10:45am - 11:05am
246 Zageir Hall

10:50am

­­The Neoliberal Bildungsroman: Individual and National “Development” in Peter Mountford’s A Young Man’s Guide to Late Capitalism and Aravind Adiga’s The White Tiger
In reference to the protagonist of Peter Mountford’s A Young Man’s Guide to Late Capitalism (2011), Leerom Medovoi writes, “Gabriel is left, by the novel’s end, to represent nothing more than the declining power of a United States that can no longer pretend that its greatest opportunities still lie ahead.” What is left in the wake of the waning power of the United States as an empire? Peter Mountford’s A Young Man’s Guide to Late Capitalism and Aravind Adiga’s The White Tiger (2008) are two contemporary novels that portray contradictory potentials for the future of the global economy. Mountford’s novel depicts Bolivia’s shift towards leftist policies and a potential rejection of neoliberal economics. Adiga demonstrates the reverse, as rising India looks to replace America as the new neoliberal powerhouse. Both novels epitomize an emergent phenomenon in contemporary fiction which I call “the neoliberal bildungsroman.” The protagonist of each book comes-of-age in the current era of what Fredric Jameson calls “multinational,” or “late capitalism,” learning how to succeed within this new economic paradigm. By fully embracing the ideology and practices of neoliberalism, both protagonists set out on an uncompromising path of destruction and deceit, looking to succeed by any means necessary. This essay will attempt to demonstrate how the portrayal of neoliberalism through the scope of a bildungsroman serves to inform our perception of contemporary economic policies and its effects on both individuals and entire nations, as they learn how to survive within the dominating force that is neoliberalism.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 10:50am - 11:10am
038 Karpen Hall

10:55am

Confronting the Threshold: Perceptions of a Passageway

Standing before a threshold can be quite stimulating, both physically and mentally. Confronting the Threshold: Perceptions of a Passageway represents liminal spaces through paintings and drawings of doors.  People often pass through these margins focusing only on their destination. Marginal spaces or thresholds are known as “liminal spaces” and can be difficult to recognize, as they are undefined territory. These short, transitional passes are incredibly significant, as stimulating thoughts occur during the passageway from one space to another. This could be a place where someone is leaving their past behind, eager to find a new beginning. This could be the waiting room, awaiting the next milestone, or an upcoming event in one’s life. On the other hand, it could be when one is indecisive. It may also be as simple as the process of opening a door and crossing a physical threshold. In addition to the more commonly known physical and anthropological contexts, there are spiritual and psychological transitions. These changes were recognized in ancient Rome regarding Janus, the god of doorways, who is often thought to be the god of beginnings and endings. This research will be represented in a series of paintings and drawings: the paintings depict life-size doors; the drawings provide details of door knobs, door handles and other elements. The art work signifies transitional zones provoking the formulation of questions in viewers’ minds. Doorways are excellent physical representations of liminal spaces, and like most liminal spaces, doors are often overlooked. Confronting the Threshold signifies transitional zones, providing an opportunity to appreciate the beauty and significance of transitions.



Wednesday April 22, 2015 10:55am - 11:15am
237 Owen Hall

11:00am

Stage Fog: The Dramatic Application of Atmospheric Science
The author of this research will explain and demonstrate the meteorological concepts at work when glycol based and other kinds of fog solutions are used for special effects in the theatre. She will accomplish this by measuring the atmospheric data inside of the building, determining the existing air circulation patterns, and synthesizing that data into multiple approaches to creating a certain effect with fog. The desired effect is the illustration of the movement of an air parcel throughout the Carol Belk Theatre. The researcher will test multiple methods of moving the fog, including the use of Dyson bladeless fans, which will be acquired through a grant from Dyson. The method proven to work best will be explained and demonstrated during the Spring 2015 Undergraduate Research Symposium.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:00am - 11:30am
Carol Belk Theatre

11:00am

Culture-Based Analysis of Bacterial Communities within Pitcher Plants (Sarracenia purpurea) of Western NC
The ability of the carnivorous pitcher plant (Sarracenia purpurea) to digest insect prey depends, in part, on plant-associated microbial communities. However, few studies have addressed diversity, distribution, and function of Sarracenia-associated bacterial populations. This study leverages natural populations of Sarracenia purpurea at two geographically distinct sites in Western North Carolina. Liquid from within the pitcher was collected aseptically, and culturable bacteria were isolated by plating on solid media. Non-selective medium was used to allow isolation of most environmental oligotrophic bacterial, while a selective medium was used to specifically enrich for antibiotic-producing members of the phylum Actinobacteria. Culturable bacteria were identified by PCR amplification and DNA sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, confirming that microbial richness within the pitcher is high. Data indicate that bacterial communities differ from plant to plant, even within the same geographic location suggesting that initial colonization may occur at random from the environment. However, specific bacterial phylogroups were present in all pitchers sampled, suggesting that Sarracenia may rely on specific microbial associations. Ongoing work will assess the functional diversity of Sarracenia-associated bacteria, including ecologically relevant traits such as motility and biofilm formation which aid in plant colonization, exoenzyme production which may aid in prey digestion, and antibiotic production which may aid in bacterial competition in the resource-limited environment within the pitcher.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:00am - 1:00pm
Wilma Sherril Center Concourse

11:00am

Does wearing a pedometer affect activity levels in college students?
Physical activity and health are directly related, with positive and negative consequences related to the amount and type of physical activity. One of the main ways by which all humans are physical active is walking, which can be defined as the gait that humans use at low speeds. This study used a Fitbit pedometer to measure the amount of steps taken in a group of (n=21) students at the University of North Carolina at Asheville over a period of 15 weeks. The goal of the study was to assess the patterns of physical activity levels and determine if wearing the pedometer had an effect on activity. Overall, pedometer use did not appear to significantly impact the physical activity levels of the students. Days per week spent wearing the Fitbit and steps per day did not change significantly over the course of the experiment. Over the course of the experiment, no student increased in steps per day wearing the Fitbit, while 4 of the 21 participants declined in activity. Overall, female participants had a significantly higher frequency of using the Fitbit (days/week) P=0.001, but males exhibited significantly higher levels of physical activity (steps/day) on days they did wear the Fitbit. It is impossible to determine if wearing a pedometer changed activity levels from prior to wearing it, but there did not appear to be any quantifiable effect on activity levels throughout the experiment.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:00am - 1:00pm
Wilma Sherril Center Concourse

11:00am

Examining Gα12 interactions with mutated P114RhoGEF proteins
G proteins are heterotrimeric proteins that signal important processes in the cell. There are many types of G proteins categorized as subfamilies. Gα12 is one of the subfamilies and these proteins have been implicated in cancerous progression. There are also proteins many that interact with Gα12, among these are the closely related P114RhoGEF and AKAP-Lbc. The exact structural interaction between Gα12 and P114RhoGEF has yet to be determined but it has been found that, like AKAP-Lbc, P114RhoGEF does interact with Gα12 as it contains similar homology in the area where AKAP-Lbc has shown to bind to Gα12. Through the use of PCR, mutations in the DNA can be engineered to form different constructs of P114RhoGEF that can then be utilized for protein-protein interaction experiments to determine the exact amino acids interacting with the known domain of Gα12. The purpose of the research is to characterize the structural interaction between Gα12 and P114RhoGEF and use this knowledge to further investigate the effects of Gα12 and P114RhoGEF binding in different cell types.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:00am - 1:00pm
Wilma Sherril Center Concourse

11:00am

Academic Entitlement, Academic Locus of Control, and Gender
The dawn of the 21st century brought a surplus of millennial college students to colleges and universities. With this surplus, professors noticed a major change in the attitudes of students and how they felt about their roles in learning and their responsibilities. Faculty became aware that these new students saw college work, which is meant to be difficult, as too hard, and thus the discussion of academic entitlement was constructed. Entitlement is defined as “unreasonable expectations of especially favorable treatment or automatic compliance with his or her expectations” (American Psychological Association, 2000). In the world of academia, academic entitlement is the unreasonable expectation that a student should receive good grades simply for showing up to class and completing assignments, rather than for producing good quality work. Recent research has hypothesized variables that could potentially produce individual or group differences in academic entitlement (AE). Some research has found that academic entitlement is higher among males than females, but this research has not attempted to distinguish between biological sex and gender roles. This research focuses on distinguishing sex from gender roles and comparing them to AE by administering a gender roles questionnaire (the Bem Sex Role Inventory, Mindgarden Publishers), as well as the Academic Entitlement Questionnaire (Kopp et al, 2011). Along with these questionnaires, this research uses the Academic Locus of Control Scale (Curtis & Trice, 2013) to test locus of control in accordance with academic entitlement. Recent research has suggested that locus of control may play a part in AE and this research attempts to clarify the correlation.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:00am - 1:00pm
Wilma Sherril Center Concourse

11:00am

ACE Scores and Help-Seeking Behavior
This comprehensive literature review will examine the existing research on the relationship between Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and help seeking behavior in college students. The primary objective of this study is to examine what the current literature indicates is the pattern of seeking help by college students who have experienced ACEs prior to the age of 18, and what types of help are being sought. The relationship between the ten specific types of ACEs (i.e., parental incarceration, sexual abuse) and help seeking behavior will also be examined during the current literature review. This comprehensive examination of the current research will lay the groundwork for future data collection at UNCA examining the relationship between ACEs and help seeking behavior within our own community.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:00am - 1:00pm
Wilma Sherril Center Concourse

11:00am

Athlete’s Bodies; Emphasizing Function or Physique?
Athletes, and their bodies, are often in the spotlight. With societal pressures on appearance, athletes may emphasize the importance of how their bodies look rather than how they perform. Previous research has shown that females report higher levels of concern about body appearance than males. The goal of this study was to measure male and female college student athletes’ perceptions of their bodies and compare them across differing sports. We hypothesized that overall females would have more critical or negative perceptions of their bodies than males. We administered surveys assessing physical self-concept to members of the women’s and men’s tennis, soccer, basketball, and cross country teams (approximately 50 females and 60 males) at UNC Asheville. Specific subscales, adapted from previous research, assessed participants’ comfort with their bodies, confidence with their bodies, and self-evaluation of various aspects of body image (e.g., perceived body fat, body shape, and muscularity). Responses of males and females will be compared in the effort to identify possible similarities or differences in physical self-concept. Our findings may help identify disparities between male and female athletes’ body perceptions as well as aid in understanding how athletics affects body perception.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:00am - 1:00pm
Wilma Sherril Center Concourse

11:00am

Blue or Pink: Toy Marketing and Gender Stereotypes
Toys have always reflected the world that children are being prepared to enter, and by extension its belief systems. How are toys marketed to children differently based on gender? The purpose of this content analysis was to examine whether contemporary toys are packaged, priced, or colored to specifically appeal to one gender. In addition, we considered whether stores display toys in gender-specific or gender-neutral ways. Data were collected from six toy stores located in Asheville, NC. Three were local, independently-owned stores while three were corporate chains. We examined 200 toys marketed towards children ages 5-7. We designed a customized rating sheet that addressed category of toy, price, coloring, location in store, and related variables. We will then compare frequency of gender-specific toys vs. gender-neutral toys within our designated age group. We are especially interested in toys that might encourage particular career interests, which might influence children’s subsequent attraction to academic or vocational pursuits. Our findings will have implications for gender-based play patterns and, potentially, gender-segregated career patterns in the United States.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:00am - 1:00pm
Wilma Sherril Center Concourse

11:00am

Courage Under Fire: Silver Screen Representations of Female Military Personnel
How are female military personnel depicted in contemporary films? Previous research on gender portrayals in film has not addressed this specific question. We will examine cinematic portrayals of service women; we anticipate that female characters in the military will be depicted in a biased or inaccurate manner. Ten films with female characters in any branch of the military will be viewed and critically evaluated. A content analysis rating sheet will be used to assess demographic information as well as gender roles of the female characters. The rating sheet contains a list of stereotypical masculine and feminine characteristics, which will be individually evaluated. We will summarize ratings of assessed female characters across all films in the effort to determine whether cinematic portrayals parallel actual qualities of women in the military. This study could shed light on societal misconceptions about and stereotypes of female military personnel and clarify how these impressions relate to traditional gender role stereotypes.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:00am - 1:00pm
Wilma Sherril Center Concourse

11:00am

Differences in Appraisal of Benevolent and Hostile Sexism Behaviors
Research has shown that perceiving sexism in one’s life can have a multitude of negative effects. One theory of sexism, ambivalent sexism, suggests that sexism may come in two forms: hostile and benevolent. Hostile sexism is expressed when women do not fit into traditional female gender roles, while benevolent sexism is expressed as chivalry, or romanticism towards women. Because benevolently sexist behaviors may be less violent or seemingly more positive, it is thought to be more subtle in nature, allowing it to more often pass undetected as sexism. However, not much research has investigated how women perceive these two forms of sexism. Are there any differences in the appraisal of sexist behaviors based on whether the situation is hostile or benevolent? What types of behaviors associated with benevolent and hostile sexism do people appraise as sexist? Undergraduate women (N=104) completed online surveys that asked about experiences that could be appraised as sexist. We expect that behaviors associated with benevolent sexism will be less often appraised as sexist than behaviors associated with hostile sexism. Measuring these variables is important because it could help to determine how the aspects of benevolent and hostile sexism are perceived as sexism.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:00am - 1:00pm
Wilma Sherril Center Concourse

11:00am

Do Self-­Defense Precautions Increase Women’s Sense of Security?
Women are often targeted for assault in varying life situations. Some authorities suggest that women should behave in certain ways, altering their lifestyles, in order to avoid being accosted or attacked. Prior research studies suggest that women who are knowledgeable about self-defense feel less vulnerable overall. The goal of our research is to determine whether or not women who are familiar with self-defense measures feel a greater sense of security than those who have no such knowledge. We hypothesize that women with knowledge about self-defense initiatives feel safer on a daily basis than women who do not. We distributed 100 surveys to female college students at UNC Asheville that contained questions pertaining to levels of safety experienced on a daily basis as well as opinions about and familiarity with self-defense measures. Survey questions included both open-ended items and questions answered on the basis of five-point Likert scales (e.g., 1=not at all, 5=very). We will calculate item means for each objectively-rated question in order to determine overall opinions about security and self-defense measures. We hope that our findings will prove valuable in meeting the needs of college women who wish to feel safe and secure. Ideally, our research will encourage college administrations to introduce programs that will equip female students with information or self-defense skills needed to enhance their sense of security.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:00am - 1:00pm
Wilma Sherril Center Concourse

11:00am

Female Body Messages in Television Then and Now
Young adult females internalize body image messages from an array of media sources. Popular television series are a main source of influence, often displaying unrealistically thin ideals. Prior research has shown that viewing thin female characters is detrimental to female viewers, leading to body dissatisfaction and other negative psychological outcomes. In light of such negative consequences for females, there has been increased awareness of how displays of thinness in the media have become the norm, failing to represent realistic female bodies. We sought to examine whether body types in popular television shows have changed in response to this attention. In addition, we analyzed messages about weight and body size that were present in the same shows. We selected six Emmy award-winning shows, three current and three from ten years ago. Using a 9-point scale to assess body mass, ranging from thin to overweight, we will compile a mean size of female characters across all the shows; we will then compare shows from the two time periods in the effort to evaluate change over time. We will also summarize the number of body-positive or body-negative messages that take place in the shows. We hope our findings will demonstrate progress in television portrayals, with increased incorporation of more realistic female bodies and positive body messages. If this is not the case, our findings will suggest that that television producers need to make changes in casting and scripts in the effort to improve psychological well-being of their female viewership.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:00am - 1:00pm
Wilma Sherril Center Concourse

11:00am

Gender Stereotypes among Women in Film: 1950s vs. 2014
Societal changes can often be traced through popular culture media. Our research examines how the portrayal of women in popular films from two time periods (the 1950s and 2014) has changed over the years. We hypothesized that between these two movie eras we will see an increase of stereotypic “masculine” behaviors and a decrease in stereotypic “feminine” behaviors for women. We examined five of the top-grossing films from the 1950s and five of the top-grossing films of 2014, assessing women’s roles, behaviors, and interactions in each film. We adopted a system of evaluation based on prior research studies, using five-point Likert scales to assess the presence of specific characteristics. We will evaluate portrayals across the five films from each time period and then compare mean ratings between the two eras in the effort to evaluate possible change. We hope that our findings will encourage awareness of gender portrayals in popular culture, including possible gender stereotypes, potentially changing the way viewers respond to such images.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:00am - 1:00pm
Wilma Sherril Center Concourse

11:00am

Keeping Abreast of Infant Feeding Decisions and Political Ideologies
How do young adults view breastfeeding, and do their attitudes reflect particular political ideologies? Prior research studies have examined reasons for breastfeeding, but we found no previous investigations that focused on whether political beliefs predict decisions about how to feed infants. Because political beliefs are associated with many other characteristics, such as religiosity and dating habits, we hypothesized that they would also be relevant to breastfeeding decision-making. Specifically, we expected that liberal beliefs would be associated with more favorable attitudes towards breastfeeding regardless of age. Secondly, we hypothesized that persons 25 years and older would be more apt to breastfeed or recommend breastfeeding than persons under 25. We recruited more than 200 participants via an online survey by posting the link to our personal social media pages. Our sample was not confined to a certain geographical area, but gender and age were disclosed. In addition, our survey assessed participants’ beliefs about their likelihood of breastfeeding or formula-feeding using 3- and 5-point Likert-type scales (e.g., 1=not likely, 3=very likely), and we allowed participants to self-identify their political ideologies. Our analyses will compare respondents’ breastfeeding decisions with their political ideologies and their ages. A possible implication of this study would be increased awareness of characteristics associated with breastfeeding decisions, which could enable public health efforts to encourage breastfeeding to tailor their marketing.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:00am - 1:00pm
Wilma Sherril Center Concourse

11:00am

Mindfulness, Childhood Trauma, and Quality of Life
For decades research has been done on mindfulness and adverse childhood experiences. Research on adverse childhood experiences, beginning in the 1990s, done by Robert F. Anda and Vincent J. Felitti, studying adults in the medical community, has shown links between childhood trauma and medical and psychological outcomes such as poor lifestyle choices such as drinking, smoking, obesity, physical inactivity, use of illicit drugs, promiscuity and suicide attempts. Decades worth of mindfulness research reveal correlations between high levels of trait and state mindfulness and resistance to various forms of psychopathology and physical illness. However, a minimal amount of research has been done indicating the effects of mindfulness on quality of life in those who have experienced various types of childhood trauma. This study uses an Adverse Childhood Experiences Scale (ACE) along with a Quality of Life Scale and Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS) to study these effects. In this study we gathered data on the relationship between dispositional mindfulness and quality of life in populations that experienced childhood trauma. This data might help medical professionals assess whether or not mindfulness based treatment programs will be of use in assisting those in life who have been through childhood trauma.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:00am - 1:00pm
Wilma Sherril Center Concourse

11:00am

Mindfulness, Discrimination and Health
This research investigates whether mindfulness, or contemplative awareness of one’s surroundings, may moderate the effects of sexism on health outcomes, specifically depression. Much research already suggests that individuals who report more experience with discrimination also tend to report more negative health outcomes (Pascoe & Smart Richman, 2009). Mindfulness skills, however, have been shown to have mitigating effects on the negative outcomes associated with many experiences that are typically harmful (Weger et al., 2011) and may be related to experiencing fewer depressive symptoms (Desrosiers et al., 2014). Additionally, trait mindfulness has the capacity to moderate the relationship between perceiving discrimination and developing depressive symptoms (Richman et al., 2014). This research aims at investigating how the buffering effects of mindfulness change when experiencing aspects of ambivalent sexism. Glick and Fiske (1996; 2001) posit that sexism consists of both negative beliefs and positive, yet still stereotypical, beliefs about women. Hostile sexism is a blatantly negative and rigidly traditional view of gender relations. Benevolent sexism is a subtle reinforcement of feminine stereotypes, which often has positive undertones that cause it to be endorsed, accepted, or go unrecognized. We hypothesize that higher degrees of mindfulness and experiences with ambivalent sexism will interact in predicting lower depressive symptoms.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:00am - 1:00pm
Wilma Sherril Center Concourse

11:00am

Perceptions of Violence: Comparisons Between Men and Women
Much research has been conducted on the topic of violence. However, most studies focus on violent behaviors or acts of violence rather than perceptions of violence; when perceptions are examined, they usually incorporate perspectives of the victims, or occasionally perspectives of perpetrators. In contrast, our study investigated the viewpoints of men and women concerning violence to evaluate whether the genders see violence differently. Specifically, our main question was whether men perceive violence less negatively than women. A survey was constructed and given to 60 participants, both male and female, aged 18 to 30. The survey was administered on the UNC Asheville campus and also within the community. We measured perceptions of violence using items selected from prior studies as well as neutral items that we created; items were assessed using 5-point Likert scales. We will compare item means between males and females in order to see if there are gender differences in perceptions of violence. Such differences could be important in explaining gender discrimination in response to violent acts. Our findings will also be meaningful for anyone experiencing violence firsthand and may serve to inform those who do not know about potential lasting effects of violence.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:00am - 1:00pm
Wilma Sherril Center Concourse

11:00am

Priming Goal Orientations in Individuals who Vary on Personality Characteristics and Self-Reported Depression
Goal Theory categorizes motivation as either mastery oriented or performance oriented. Mastery goal orientation entails engaging in a task or activity because of genuine interest and desire to improve for oneself, whereas performance goal orientation entails engaging in a task or activity to show others capability and outperform peers. In this study participants will be primed for performance goal orientation, mastery goal orientation, or not primed at all before having their cognitive capacity assessed through administration of a unicursal puzzle task. Relationships between participants’ performance and their personality characteristics and self-reported depression will then be analyzed. Participants will also report on their interest level on the task. Independent variables include the five aspects of personality, self-reported depression, and priming group. Dependent variables are the time it takes to complete tasks, perception of performance after the initial task, and the option of completing more unicursal puzzles after completing the study. Participants in the study will be undergraduate students at a liberal arts university.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:00am - 1:00pm
Wilma Sherril Center Concourse

11:00am

Representation of Black Women in Women’s Magazines
According to the United States Census Bureau, Black people make up 13.2% of the population. Do magazines for women incorporate this same percentage of images of Black women? My hypothesis is that Black women are underrepresented within the pages of mainstream women’s magazines. This study examined the presence of Black women in photographs and advertisements in the most recent issues of popular women’s magazines. In addition to noting the frequency of Black women in comparison with White women, I also assessed how Black women were portrayed, for example, in terms of appearance or body type. I will compare the frequency of White and Black women by magazine as well as across all magazines total.  I will also examine the representation of Black women and whether Black models appear to be held to White standards of beauty.  My findings have implications for societal views of minority women as well as the relative invisibility of Black women in popular culture.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:00am - 1:00pm
Wilma Sherril Center Concourse

11:00am

Self-objectification in response to images of performance versus sexualized female athletes
Previous research indicates that exposure to sexualized media images of females has a negative impact on women’s body satisfaction. Research also indicates that involvement in athletics or sports teams, specifically those that do not require leanness or attractiveness, may lessen women’s negative body image. Building on this research, the current study examined body satisfaction in women, both athletes and non-athletes, after viewing media images of female athletes. Participants were shown one of two types of images: women athletes demonstrating highly skilled or powerful physical movements such as dribbling a basketball or chasing a soccer ball (performance athletes), or women athletes wearing minimal clothing, posing in suggestive ways (sexualized athletes). About 50 female participants from the psychology and health and wellness departments viewed the images and then answered 24 questions assessing levels of self-objectification, body shame, and beliefs about controlling appearance. We expect to see an overall increase in body satisfaction among athletes exposed to performance images and reduced body satisfaction in both athletes and non-athletes exposed to the sexualized images. The results of our study may potentially inform interventions to promote positive body image in women through media literacy or athletic programs.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:00am - 1:00pm
Wilma Sherril Center Concourse

11:00am

Sexualization of Women in Super Bowl Advertisements
Following the 2015 Super Bowl game, the sexualization and objectification of women in commercials was a prominent topic in post-game analysis.  Prior research suggests that sexualization, defined as depictions of people that emphasize their sex appeal or sexual attractiveness, has greatly increased in media portrayals of women in recent years. To what extent are women sexualized in Super Bowl commercials and to what audiences are these ads directed?  We hypothesized that commercials aimed towards heterosexual males (e.g., advertisements for tools, burgers, or sports) will demonstrate increased sexualization in comparison with commercials directed towards females. By using the popular video site, YouTube, and searching “Super Bowl 2013-2015,” we gathered the 30 most-viewed commercials. We rated the amount of sexualization present in different categories, such as pose or body language, on scales of 1-5 (1=nonsexualized, 5=hypersexualized).  We then collected the numerical results from the individual commercial ratings in order to sort them into the final overall categories of nonsexualized, sexualized, and hypersexualized. Our findings may be useful in raising awareness regarding the frequency and extent to which women are being turned into objects of sexualization, specifically within Super Bowl commercials. Such images may be damaging because viewers may be desensitized to their occurrence, which may send implicit messages not only to men, but also to women and children. By calling attention to sexualization, we hope to create a sense of consciousness and awareness, motivating positive change.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:00am - 1:00pm
Wilma Sherril Center Concourse

11:00am

What Do We Think Of Sex Offenders? Well, It Depends…
We examined differences in attitudes toward convicted sex offenders based on gender of the offender. Prior research has focused on attitudes toward female sex offenders, juvenile sex offenders, and offenders with other specific characteristics, but comparisons in attitudes toward male vs. female offenders has not previously been undertaken. We hypothesized that we would discover significantly more negative regard for male than female offenders. A survey used in an earlier study was modified to include a vignette which described a male or a female perpetrator; all details in the vignette except for the perpetrator’s gender were the same in both survey versions. College students were recruited for participation, and we aimed for a comparable number of male and female respondents. In addition, the survey was made available electronically. We will summarize ratings of each offender depicted in the vignette, comparing the male and female version. The implications of our findings will shed light on possible bias found in the criminal justice system and the inequities some offenders suffer due to housing and job restrictions.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:00am - 1:00pm
Wilma Sherril Center Concourse

11:00am

What’s in a Name?
There have been many advancements toward gender equality in recent history. In spite of these advancements, most women in heterosexual marriages continue to take their husbands’ last names upon marriage. How do women and men view post-marital name change? Our study examined whether people intend to change, or have changed, their last names upon marriage, and their perceptions about the meaning of name changes. We predicted that women would be more open to varying from traditional name change than men. Over 60 participants over the age of 18 were surveyed, both female and male; we aimed for an equal number of both genders. The survey consisted of forced choice questions as well as open-ended questions. Participants were recruited through an online survey website as well as from Facebook. We will compare responses from males and females, examining the reasons that men and women give regarding their decisions to change or not change their last names upon marriage. By looking at individuals’ attitudes towards post-marriage name changes, we can begin to formulate ideas about the connection between name changes and gender equality beliefs in today’s world.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:00am - 1:00pm
Wilma Sherril Center Concourse

11:00am

Working Memory and Perceptions on Performance
Working memory (WM) measures have in the past been used in lieu of IQ measures. The perception of the relationship between WM or IQ and how well individuals perform on tasks may have more power over performance than that individual’s actual ability to perform. Approximately 30 participants at a small liberal arts university will participate in this study. Participants will complete a working memory task. They will be grouped according to WM span score. Within each group, half will read a passage on how WM correlates with performance; the remaining half will read about how WM does not correlate with performance. Participants will then complete a challenging task. Differences in performance will be examined with regard to group membership. Analyses will reveal possible differences between the groups (high and low working memory span; reading about whether WM predicts performance or not). It is expected that individual perception on how working memory affects the ability to complete a challenging task will impact actual performance.  


Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:00am - 1:00pm
Wilma Sherril Center Concourse

11:05am

Molecular species determination of an unknown snake in the pituophis genus
Molecular genetic techniques have been implemented to differentiate between two morphologically similar species of snake, the pine snake (Pituophis melanolecus) and a congeneric gopher snake (Pituophis catenifer). The genetic identity of a display snake specimen is currently being debated by staff at the Western North Carolina Nature Center in Asheville, NC. Total genomic DNA was extracted from snakeskin, and the ND4 mitochondrial DNA region was amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The PCR product was confirmed using gel electrophoresis, sequenced, and compared to known mtDNA sequences of the congeners. Because both potential candidates contain multiple subspecies with convergent morphologies, the ability to distinguish between closely related species of Pituophis could provide a substantial molecular basis to support taxonomic claims.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:05am - 11:25am
014 Zeis Hall

11:05am

Computational Investigation of O-H Bond Cleavage Reactions of Primary Alcohols on Stepped Rhodium (211) Surfaces Using Density Functional Theory
Proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells using hydrogen fuels can be used as an alternative to fossil fuel energy generation that produces harmful pollutions to environment during the combustion processes. However, hydrogen gas used in PEM fuel cells is not naturally abundant and must be generated from other hydrogen containing molecules. Catalysts, such as rhodium, are commonly used to facilitate breaking C-H and O-H bonds that go on to form hydrogen gas. Ideally, hydrogen fuels are obtained from sustainable resources such as primary alcohols that can be extracted from plants. The structure of the experimental catalyst has both planar and stepped metal surfaces and it has been found that stepped surfaces are more reactive compared to planar surfaces for some reactions. Density Functional Theory (DFT) computational methods are used to investigate reactions between the metal surfaces and alcohol molecules, including calculations of lowest energies and adsorption geometries. In this research, the O-H bond cleavages of primary alcohols of varying chain length from methanol to pentanol were investigated over Rh (211) surface using DFT calculations. Comparing to Lingerfelt’s results on the planar Rh(111) surface, it was found that the stepped surface reduces reaction energies for all of the primary alcohols, from methanol through pentanol. It was also found that, as the chain length increases, the reaction energy also increases on the stepped surface.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:05am - 11:25am
123 Zeis Hall

11:05am

Monster Defiance
Why should the user be the monster slayer instead of the monster? In this twist of the age-old hero versus monster game, the users take the reigns of a fearsome creature and protects their territory. Through the use of special abilities, such as fire breath, and underground attacks, the players chooses how to protect their monsters and their land. This project's end product is a monster slayer game of the 2-D platform game genre, in which the player is the monster instead of the more traditional monster slayer.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:05am - 11:25am
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

11:05am

Le français en Nouvelle-Angleterre: A New England Dialect of French
Today, New England is very densely populated with the descendants of Quebec immigrants who settled in the region’s many small towns in the mid-19th century. Influenced by factors of geography– as these Francophone communities often resided near the French-Canadian border– and culture– by which the smallness of these communities resulted in French being spoken as a first language in a country where English was, and is, the dominant language– the type of French that has developed in New England is unlike any other French dialect in the world: A niche dialect known as New England French. In recent decades, these small, isolated communities have begun to disband due to economic and technological developments that no longer oblige these French Canadian descendants to remain in their designated regions. Similarly, the necessity for subsequent generations to learn New England French is declining as communities expand. As a result, New England French is facing endangerment as a linguistic dialect that may be lost entirely in coming years. This essay explores the historical precedent for the existence of the New England dialect of French; examines the linguistic differences that exist between this dialect and the standard French dialect spoken in France; explores how the development of this vernacular has resulted in a unique cultural identity for New England Francophones; and finally, attempts to determine a trajectory for the future of New England French, and whether it is a dialect that can be preserved for future generations.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:05am - 11:25am
406 Wilma Sherrill Center

11:05am

The Center for Diversity Twitter Analytics: Marketing an Organization
This research paper will focus on analyzing the results from Hootsuite (add to methods portion of the paper) on the Center for Diversity Education (CDE) Twitter account. The hypothesis in mind is applying successful strategies that other Twitter accounts have had in gaining a following in hopes of increasing the Center for Diversity Education accounts popularity. The paper will look at specific case studies where different companies have had success and will attempt to replicate their success. The paper will also try new innovative ideas to gain attention. Specifically I hope to achieve this by updating the twitter account daily, monitoring Hootsuite analytics on engagement and successful hash tags. I also hope to connect with other diversity centers and engage in an online discussion with them as well. Essentially the paper will be focusing on dissecting old data on what makes a twitter account popular and will be analyzing the growth of the CDE account based on new findings and research.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:05am - 11:25am
012 Karpen Hall

11:05am

Diminishing Domestic Violence: How Free Civil Legal Aid, Advocacy, and Availability of Information Effectively Help to Break the Cycles of Abuse
With the overwhelming statistics attesting to the alarmingly high number of people who are victim to intimate partner violence each year, combined with proven research and documentation affirming that the availability of free civil legal services directly impacts and reduces the incidences and rates of recurrence of domestic violence, it is abundantly clear that more programs offering free civil legal aid to victims of domestic violence, as well as increased allocation of funds for existing programs, must be established in order to more adequately combat the inexcusably persistent and problematic issue of domestic violence. This paper will address the proven success rates, as well as the far-reaching and resonating benefits of existing free civil legal aid programs throughout the nation, while also focusing particular attention on Western North Carolina’s Lifeline program offered by Pisgah Legal Services. This paper will also advocate for increased availability and funding for such programs, while also suggesting ways in which the legal profession and those who practice it can take a more accommodating and active role in helping to address the overwhelming problem of domestic violence, such as by implementing amongst lawyers a mandatory minimum of pro-bono hours to be devoted to applicable free legal aid organizations. Additionally, by further exploring the various factors and circumstances, be they social, economic, or otherwise which render people susceptible to abusive relationships and domestic violence situations, as well as assessing the inherently, yet not incorrigible, problematic legal and cultural environment responsible for reacting to this concern, this paper will argue that the very same systems, cycles, and organizations that are responsible for addressing the ramifications of domestic violence must also be held culpable to enact programs which make abundantly available information, advocacy, and assistance in order to alleviate, rather than reinforce the cycle of domestic violence.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:05am - 11:25am
246 Zageir Hall

11:10am

“Making is Half, but Ruin is Everything”: Gender, Apocalypse, and the Performance of the Other in Laszlo Krasznahorkai’s The Melancholy of Resistance
Laszlo Krasznahorkai’s 1989 Hungarian novel The Melancholy of Resistance is, for lack of a better word, an apocalypse text. The work is primarily about a decaying, communal village invaded by a circus caravan containing a mysterious, deformed outsider known as the Prince, who commands the town to rise up in violent revolt at the idea of existence itself. Fueling this revolt is the complex negotiation of gendered and ethnic performances, as well as the decentering of embodied identities. Demarked as an other, the Prince is able to use his physical deformity as a locus of power, presenting himself as an othered presence. Mrs. Eszter, a fascistic political leader succeeding the Prince, also draw shame and performative power from her othered, masculine form. I argue the collapse in Krasznahorkai’s novel is most immediately reflected in both of these bodies; in many ways, the apocalyptic violence in the text itself gives authority to what Judith Butler terms the “domain of abjected bodies.” By more fully interrogating the performances of both Eszter and the Prince—the way they are villainized, their interactions with others, and the similar roles they both occupy in the work—they become understandable as both societally excluded forms and a potential site of resistance—of ruin-making—to oppressive, inhumane societies. Ultimately, by looking at the way these othered figures are empowered in the text, a greater understanding of collapse culture in general becomes possible.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:10am - 11:30am
038 Karpen Hall

11:25am

Sexual Dimorphism in Vampire Bats Abstract
Sexual dimorphism occurs in many mammals and has been shown to occur in common Vespertilionid bats, with females larger in size than males. Female mammals are sometimes larger than males in order to be able to carry their offspring while pregnant. Males exhibit larger size in order to compete for a mate or territory, as seen in lions. Measuring sexual dimorphism can help explain mating and roosting behavior of species that are not well known, and to see if patterns of dimorphism are constrained from a phylogenetic context. Vampire bats’ teeth are highly specialized to extract blood from their prey, meaning that they would not be expected to be dimorphic between males and females. Any dimorphisms found in this study will be useful to better understand the extent of competition and self-protection present in vampire bats. This study investigated patterns of sexual dimorphisms in three different vampire bat species:  Desmodus rotundus, Diphylla eucaudata, and Diaemus youngi. Skull size and canine size of males and females of each species were measured from skulls of museum collections and digital photographs. In all three species, male canines were found to be significantly larger than female canines. Diphylla eucaudata, Diaemus youngi, and Desmodus rotundus male canines were an average of .19, .27, and .23 mm longer than females, respectively. In Desmodus rotundus, the male skulls were found to be 3% smaller than the females. These results show that males use their canines for more than just feeding, which motivates further research on this subject.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:25am - 11:45am
014 Zeis Hall

11:25am

Analysis of the Effect of Air Sparging Activity on Trichloroethene and Cis 1,2 Dichloroethene Content in Surface Streams
Trichloroethene (TCE) and its degradation product (via microbial action) cis 1,2 dichloroethene (DCE) are contaminants found at the CTS of Asheville, Inc, a former electroplating facility. Due to high levels of the contaminants, the site became an EPA superfund site.  Contamination is also found at property neighboring CTS of Asheville and an air sparging system was installed in 2014 to reduce TCE air levels.  For this study, stream samples were collected and analyzed for TCE and DCE using Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry from the property adjacent to the superfund site for a span of 2 years (prior to, during and after the air sparging system installation).  TCE and DCE contamination concentration and volatilization rates downstream were determined.  During system installation, TCE contamination in the stream decreased to less than a third of prior values and DCE increased by about a factor of 3.  The combined amount of TCE and DCE remained the same, indicating that the contamination remained constant but TCE had degraded more readily into DCE during installation.  After system installation was completed, the TCE concentration began increasing and DCE concentration decreasing.  The full analysis of contamination levels and volatilization rates will be presented. 


Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:25am - 11:45am
123 Zeis Hall

11:25am

Digital Dog Food
Being a pet owner requires a multi-year daily commitment, to provide and care for the pet. While most pet owners are able to make adjustments in their lifestyle to accommodate the needs of an animal, there are, at times, unavoidable conflicts which prevent us from fulfilling our responsibilities. The primary challenges dog owners face are providing food and water, a place to eliminate waste, and exercise. This project solves the first, and arguably most important, challenge of providing food and water to a pet when the pet owner cannot physically do so. Through the utilization of a computer microcontroller and the development of an Android application, this proof of concept system demonstrates that anyone can feed their dog remotely with just the touch of a button on their phone.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:25am - 11:45am
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

11:25am

Hashtag Campaigning: Using Hashtags to Promote a Social Media Campaign
This research paper focuses on the influence hashtags have on social media campaigns; specifically, the Truth campaign’s use of the #LeftSwipeDat to end teen smoking. This study will analyze what significance hashtags have on social media audiences and if hashtags make a significant difference in marketing. The use of hashtags as a marketing tool is rapidly growing on social media. However, using hashtags successfully in a marketing context can be challenging. This paper will also look at what makes hashtags effective and successful. Using data collected from following the hashtag #LeftSwipeDat on Facebook and Twitter, this paper analyzes the overall trends and sentiments based on user feedback. Data was gathered and statistics were organized through Hootsuite over the time period of six weeks. This study broadens the ability for companies to understand the impact of a hashtag within their fan base.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:25am - 11:45am
012 Karpen Hall

11:30am

Making Race Invisible: The Anticipation of Colorblind Racism in Invisible Man
While many critics focus on the allegorical criticism of Booker T. Washington’s philosophy of racial uplift in Invisible Man, there has not been much attention devoted to how the novel anticipates the rise of colorblind racism and how this ideology perpetuates social inequality and immobility. Through analyzing the narrator’s realization that he is an invisible man because of the racial stereotypes that he is bound to, the novel explores how race is a social construction that holds no biological basis to reality. Considering the oppressive origins behind race and its ability to distort individuality and limit opportunity in Invisible Man, it may seem as if the novel is advocating a society in which race is no longer relevant. However, while race may be socially constructed it still holds a social reality that cannot be ignored. When ignoring this social reality one falls into the trap of colorblind racism. Those who attempt to embrace the idea of colorblindness claim to see people rather than color and judge people on character rather than the color of their skin. Yet claiming that race is no longer relevant in a country that is still plagued with an enormous amount of racial inequity engenders a new form of racism that justifies this inequality as the outcome of non-racial factors. In understanding the narrator’s experiences with false generosity behind treacherous motives to maintain oppressive power structure, the importance of cultural heritage, the struggles working in the labor industry, and a colorblind organization called The Brotherhood, one cannot disregard the difficulties African Americans experience due to race. Through exploring instances in the novel that anticipate the rise of colorblind racism, it is evident that racism is not just explicit prejudice but a system of advantage that needs to be acknowledged and actively fought against.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:30am - 12:30pm
038 Karpen Hall

11:50am

Women's Bodies and Narrative In Drucula
The plot of Dracula concerns a group of Englishmen, nicknamed “The Crew of Light”, fighting against a vampire called Dracula who intends to conquer the British Isles by turning the populace into vampires. As the primary targets of Dracula’s conquest are young women, a war for England is essentially fought over the bodies of its women. Some of the finer details of the text seem to support this notion, as the language describing the vampires’ attacks indicates that being bitten is a metaphor for sex. Vampire bites even serve the same function as sex, being a means of reproduction for vampires. In the novel, the women who succumb to the deviant sexuality of the vampire are punished violently, but not because their sexuality is free—rather, because they have been taken from their rightful husbands and culture. Only through violence can their souls and proper purpose be restored. Throughout Dracula, we can easily see how attitudes towards women and their role in society play out in narrative


Wednesday April 22, 2015 11:50am - 12:10pm
038 Karpen Hall

12:40pm

Synthesis of the Ficellomycin Core using a Late-Stage [3+2]-azide Alkene Cycloaddition
Antibiotics are crucial for fighting bacterial infections, and many antibiotics are produced by bacteria in an effort to destroy their competition. Researchers have developed methods for isolating and modifying antibiotic compounds so that they can be used to treat bacterial infections in humans. One such compound, ficellomycin, which was first isolated from the Streptomyces ficellus bacterium in the 1970’s, has been found to inhibit the growth of many Gram-positive bacteria, including some antibiotic-resistant organisms. Since its isolation, research on ficellomycin’s synthesis and mechanism of action has been limited because of its highly unstable azabicyclo[3.1.0]hexane core. The objective of this research was to synthesize the core of ficellomycin from L-serine and to investigate the use of a late-state [3+2]-azide alkene cycloaddition to construct the azabicycle[3.1.0]hexane core in a single step. To date, the acyclic carbon backbone has been synthesized in 6 steps (52-92% yield) and [3+2]azide alkene cycloaddition studies are ongoing. Anticipated future research includes completing the synthesis scheme and increasing the efficiency of specific individual steps.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 12:40pm - 1:00pm
123 Zeis Hall

12:40pm

Babbling, Braining, and Brooding Mr. Bones: An Exploration of the Meta in 77 Dream Songs
John Berryman’s Pulitzer Prize winning book of poems, 77 Dream Songs, is about a character named Henry, who is “at odds wif de world and its god” (5.1. Line 3). Henry is an estranged character, a lonely American man, who sometimes speaks in an offensive vernacular derived from the minstrel show tradition, and who is incessantly preoccupied with death. His reflections on the world are sometimes misanthropic, oftentimes inebriated, and yet a strange pathos is evoked by his inability to attain an emotional stasis. More importantly, like John Berryman, Henry is a literary figure, who persistently frames his experiences through acts of creative self-expression such as song, the written word, or even prayer. It is in this sense that 77 Dream Songs functions as a work of meta poetry, which comments heavily on the act of artistic creation. Henry is compelled to express himself through poetic language, which is presented as both a source of comfort and torment for his character. Furthermore, throughout The Dream Songs he is portrayed as being physically mutilated. In the very first Dream Song for instance, we learn that he is “pried / open for all the world to see” (1.2. 11-12). Several more circumstances occur in which Henry is unraveled, both physically and mentally. What his character expresses then, is the compulsive relationship that the poet feels towards his art, while also suggesting the necessary disfigurement and fragmentation of personal experience in relation to the poetics of the 77 Dream Songs.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 12:40pm - 1:00pm
038 Karpen Hall

1:00pm

Eastern Hellbender Or Ozark Hellbender? DNA Sampling To Determine A Salamander’s Identity
There has been a rapid decline in populations of the Eastern hellbender salamander and the endangered subspecies, the Ozark salamander, due to a highly infectious fungal disease caused by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife service currently considers the Eastern hellbender a species of concern, while the Ozark subspecies was federally listed as endangered in 2011. Declining populations of both species have prompted conservation efforts throughout the hellbender’s range in the Eastern United States, from Arkansas to New York. The Western North Carolina Nature Center (WNCNC) believe that they have an Eastern hellbender salamander in their care. However, WNCNC requested genetic testing to confirm that it is an Eastern hellbender and eliminate the possibility that it is the endangered Ozark hellbender subspecies. If the salamander is found to be an Ozark hellbender instead of an Eastern hellbender, then a special permit to house an endangered species will be required. To determine the subspecies of the WNCNC hellbender, a thick mucosal excretion sample was collected from the organism and DNA was extracted using the DNeasy Tissue and Blood Kit. The extracted DNA was then amplified at the cytochrome B region of mitochondrial DNA, and the resulting PCR product was sequenced. Results were compared with known DNA sequences from both hellbender subspecies to rectify uncertainty over the salamander’s identity. This species classification is essential for the proper care of the specimen and to ensure that the correct animal curation paperwork is on file.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 1:00pm - 1:20pm
014 Zeis Hall

1:00pm

Computational determination of reaction energetics of metal-catalyzed carbon ring opening
Bio-renewable fuel sources have been the subjects of much debate in recent decades, as public concern for environmental impact and energy security has become more pronounced. This study focused on several isomers of dehydrogenated cyclopentane and cylopentanol. Periodic Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations were performed on methylcyclopentane, methylcyclopentanol, cyclopentan-(1,3,4)-triol and the carbohydrate glucose. A Rh (111) surface was used as a catalyst in these models and the molecule-surface binding energy was calculated for each isomer. Additionally the reaction energetics of C=C cleavage was calculated for each isomer. All calculations were carried out using the VASP software package. It was determined that the reactions were endothermic, and require energy to break the targeted bonds. This is largely a result of ring strain, caused by the molecules attempting to maintain their cyclic shape.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 1:00pm - 1:20pm
123 Zeis Hall

1:00pm

Gnosis Sequencing Device
You don’t have to be Madonna to incorporate Kabbalistic mysticism into your music! Drawing on the principles of esoteric Tarot card reading and avant-garde composition, the Gnosis sequencing device will produce new and dynamic melodic patterns by performing a ‘Tarot reading’ on the musician’s initial musical input. The musician will be able to adjust parameters for the reading, save reading parameters, and input new musical data in real-time. The device will first be prototyped in software, then implemented as a standalone hardware device for use with various electronic musical instruments.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 1:00pm - 1:20pm
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

1:00pm

The World in Harmony Framed: An Approach to Renaissance Poetics from the Works of Thomas Campion and His Contemporaries
This thesis questions fundamental assumptions about analytical approaches and evaluative procedures relating to the interpretation of early-modern English poetry. In particular it looks at how typical analyses prioritize elements of close reading, such as complexity of diction, syntax, metaphor, which in many ways neglect to account for the full possibility for interpretation. Because this thesis challenges core assumptions about poetry, it will require a reworking of approach that requires that the generative elements of poetry, especially linguistics, phonetics, and prosody, which form the foundation of literature, be considered alongside secondary features, mainly historical perspectives, performative traditions, metaphysical assumptions, and cultural backgrounds. This research will be focalized through Elizabethan poet and musician Thomas Campion and select examples from his contemporaries. Campion’s large body of lyric verse presents a unique challenge to criticism from any literary perspective in that his literature being written simultaneously as music deconstructs fundamental assumptions about the sanctity of the written text. This research uses this inherent deconstruction and its ripple effects as the foundation for an argument towards multi-disciplinary approaches. Conclusions are based upon close considerations of the relationship between music and poetry. This approach is ordered as such: firstly by an establishment of issue and context, secondly by close analysis using modified and interdisciplinary approaches, and thirdly through hermeneutic conclusions positing some potentially rewarding alternatives to traditional analysis and greater insight into English Renaissance Poetics.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 1:00pm - 1:20pm
038 Karpen Hall

1:00pm

Assessing Local Interventions in Food Insecurity
Previous research has confirmed that access to healthful foods is most limited among racial minorities and low-income populations, and that these same populations experience the highest rates of food insecurity. This investigation focuses on potential solutions, using a case study approach to document efforts that are already underway in Asheville to address food access. Specifically, this study examines two local mobile market initiatives. Bounty and Soul is a non-profit based in Black Mountain that currently provides local produce at several market locations, and has plans to bring their produce directly into low-income areas via a food truck. The Healthy Living Program at the YMCA recently launched the Healthy Living Mobile Kitchen (HLMK), an initiative that began as an extension of the YMCA’s food pantry with the goal of reaching communities that lack access to a YMCA facility. Drawing on participant observation, interviews, and review of organizational materials, the successes and challenges of these two food access interventions are compared. Findings suggest that although large quantities of food are being distributed in the local community, better funding and more staff may be necessary to make a lasting impact that goes beyond service provision and toward structural change.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 1:00pm - 1:20pm
033 Karpen Hall

1:00pm

When the Stage Grows Large Words Grow Larger
This research project analyzes players from different colleges and their Journey to the Tourney through social media. As basketball teams win or lose players react, providing the media and other social media influencers some insight into how this stage can raise up or harm reputation. These players from large and small schools range in age from 18 to 23 which gives way for raw sometimes unfiltered emotional responses. If a student athlete takes it too far the NCAA or the school itself will punish the athlete in an attempt to detour this action in the future. With Facebook and Twitter being a 24/7 medium to release news and frustration, players can be accessed at their most vulnerable moments. This study will be carried out starting with the conference tournaments going through the first four and concluding sometime near the second or third weekend in the NCAA tournament. Hootsuite Pro, an online social media analytics tool, will be used to study the influence of what is said, and to observe specific player accounts.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 1:00pm - 1:20pm
012 Karpen Hall

1:00pm

Political Factors in Environmental Policy Performance
Environmental policy effectiveness is an area of particular interest as environmental problems threaten the lives of millions of people worldwide. This paper examines the impact of political variables including regime type, political openness, and corruption on environmental performance. Democracies are expected to have better environmental policy performance than authoritarian regimes. Regardless of regime type, regimes with greater political freedom are expected to have better environmental policy performance, as are regimes with less corruption. Scatter plots comparing regime type and environmental policy performance show that while democracies do tend to perform better than other types of regimes, authoritarian regimes sometimes also perform well, lending some support to the theory of authoritarian environmentalism. However, a higher level of political freedom does not always lead to better environmental policy performance, while corruption negatively affects the policy performance of all regime types.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 1:00pm - 1:20pm
016 Karpen Hall

1:20pm

Turning the Gaze: Zoe Leonard’s Anatomical Models Series
In the eighteenth century, the Western medical field approached the female body as a foil to the neutral male form based upon Christian ideals and sexual taboos. Depictions of women in medical textbooks as well as anatomical models furthered the idea of women as classicized, submissive reproductive vessels. Zoe Leonard, in her 1992 photographic series “Anatomical Models” examines these eighteenth century relics through an interventionist, feminist lens. Referencing crime scene photography of the Black Dahlia, cabinet cards, and classic horror films to create a gothic tone Leonard assigns modern implications to eighteenth century objects. Through her use of black and white, analogue photography Leonard creates narratives of empathy for the models as well as constructs a sense of exploitation. The Anatomical Models series contextualizes Zoe Leonard within a feminist art movement of the 1990s focused on the carnal body, her contemporaries empower their own bodies through contrasting viscera with conventionally passive femininity. This research aims to prove that Zoe Leonard utilizes modern visual cues to highlight the continued impact of the male gaze on representations of women. The anatomical models of Leonard’s series become timeless representations of women as victims to the male and medical gaze.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 1:20pm - 1:40pm
237 Owen Hall

1:20pm

Synthesis of Polythiometalates for Possible use as Catalysts for Water Reduction
Polythiometalates are cluster compounds involving metals bound to each other with sulfur ligands. These compounds have been shown to catalyze certain reductive reactions. This presentation will focus on the attempted synthesis and characterization of chromium based polythiometalates. Syntheses attempted thus far involve elemental chromium, chromium (II), and chromium (III) based starting materials that have been combined with a sulfur source such as sodium sulfide. Syntheses involving chromium (III) appear to have been unsuccessful, however chromium (II) and elemental chromium may have yielded better results. Characterization of the products has been performed in a scanning electron microscope via EDX spectroscopy.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 1:20pm - 1:40pm
123 Zeis Hall

1:20pm

Connecting the Guardian ad Litem Association of Buncombe County
Today, a tremendous amount of communication occurs over the Internet. When we are not face-to-face we rely on technologies such as email, messaging programs, and websites to keep us updated and informed. For nonprofit organizations, it can be difficult to collaborate efficiently and effectively to members of the organization through older, slower, and tedious methods of communication such as mass-email threads, and to offer information to prospective volunteers or those seeking additional information about the organization. This project included the design and implementation of a website powered by the WordPress content management system (CMS) providing the Guardian ad Litem Association of Buncombe Country (GALABC) a user-friendly and ease-of-use experience, enabling them to collaborate across a private forum, share content and training experience, and restrict specific content to certain members. The website runs on technologies such as Ubuntu Linux, MySQL, and Nginx; optimized for speed and security in order to establish an online presence, and have the tools to effectively communicate and collaborate.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 1:20pm - 1:40pm
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

1:20pm

Habitat Preferences of Translocated Sicklefin Redhorse (Moxostoma sp.) in the Oconaluftee River near Cherokee, NC
The Sicklefin Redhorse (Moxostoma sp.) is an imperiled species whose range is restricted to Blue Ridge portions of the Hiwassee and Little Tennessee River systems in North Carolina and Georgia. The Sicklefin Redhorse population is threatened by habitat degradation, stream impediments, and restriction of their native home range that isolates and limits their population potential. In order to determine if individuals had habitat preferences when selecting habitat, we translocated 10 individuals from the Tuckasegee River into Oconaluftee River and tracked them via radio telemetry. Once occupied areas were established, we performed a visual habitat analysis adapted from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Individuals reintroduced above the Ela dam in Cherokee, NC exhibited specific preferences when selecting areas of the Oconaluftee River to occupy. The fish exerted a strong preferences for habitats with cobble, bedrock, and boulders as the dominant substrate, and a heavy presence of macrophytes. Sicklefin Redhorse were more likely to be in areas with a variety of in-stream habitat options and were at least 1 meter in depth. The Oconaluftee River contains aspects of habitat necessary for the species to thrive, and could be essential in establishing the Sicklefin Redhorse back to part of its historic range.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 1:20pm - 1:40pm
014 Zeis Hall

1:20pm

Ovid’s Judgment of Heroes: Comic Criticism in the Metamorphoses
Revolutionary in its time and still today, Ovid’s Metamorphoses is a poem of epic proportions, thematically linked by the topic of transformation. Ovid transforms the conventions of literature and culture in Metamorphoses by using a nontraditional form and mocking diction and tone. These are themselves metapoetic statements which both glorify and critique the epic genre. Central to any good epic is a hero figure; Ovid has many. By retelling the famous stories chronicled in the work of Homer and other poets, Ovid transforms the idea of the epic hero, imbuing deeply entrenched values and idealizations with nuanced perspective. Ovid presents existing, culturally-revered heroes from myth and epic through a subtle “Ovidian” lens, with a powerfully original tone and perspective, altering our understanding of the weighty legacy of epic heroism. In Ovid there is always underlying wit and subtle mockery, even when the poet writes in the revered and serious epic tradition. In this thesis, I will compare the language of two books of the larger epic to reveal a link between Ovid’s treatment of the Homeric hero Ulysses and his treatment of Rome’s first emperor, Caesar Augustus. Ovid reinvents Homer’s epic hero, favoring an intellectual and emotionally-conscious hero over a man of brute strength and reckless valor, powerfully pointing to whom he believes to be the most effective hero. Therefore, this thesis posits that Metamorphoses is not merely a collection of stories linked by the theme of physical transformations, but a instead a revolutionary reevaluation of Augustan ideals.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 1:20pm - 1:40pm
038 Karpen Hall

1:20pm

Food Hubs in Western North Carolina: Local Food Transactions
The local food system (LFS) in Western North Carolina (WNC) has been developed greatly in scope and visibility since the early 1990’s. However many challenges continue to face local food producers. The term food hub is an umbrella term that characterizes organizations that are involved in the aggregation, processing, marketing and distribution of foods. They alleviate many of the barriers facing small farmers who are often major stakeholders in local food. In doing so they allow supply from small producers to be marketed and distributed in larger food supply chains. This is an important piece of infrastructure that currently missing imposes great transaction cost to farmers. There is limited prior research on the experience of food hubs has been conducted. This work develops the food hub narrative in Western North Carolina through a collection interviews and surveys with existing regional food hubs. The theoretical framework of transaction cost theory is applied to the food hubs’ experiences and highlights the successes and challenges of food hubs. Regionally, food hubs have been successful in decreasing transaction costs for small farmers, therefore increasing total revenue. Further investigation into the practicality and impact of food hubs is merited by these findings.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 1:20pm - 1:40pm
033 Karpen Hall

1:20pm

Growing Your Music Fan Base through Social Media
This study will examine the cultivation of a social media following for musicians. Data will be collected from recording/performing artist Momentai and their social media accounts. This project will research play counts, dissemination of music across national borders, and social media to web conversion. Analytics will be formed by examining insights, the interaction of users with content. The insights will be pulled from Soundcloud, Facebook, Momentai’s personal web page, and Instagram. Soundcloud insights provide top influencers, play location, and play count. Facebook will be examined primarily for user engagement from live shows. Webpage analysis will determine what blogs/websites consumers are being pushed from. This analysis is timed around an impending record release and string of live shows from the artist. Primarily focusing on conversion; either media to product or performance media, the data will be an ongoing representation of attaining fans. This study will also look closely at more well-known pop artists and how their public relations engages with fans.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 1:20pm - 1:40pm
012 Karpen Hall

1:20pm

Presidential Productivity & the Race for Reelection
It has long been established that campaigning for reelection increases an incumbent president’s level of activity. It is unclear to what extent this affects their ability to maintain typical productivity. I hypothesis that due to the additional activity and stress that are inherent in the campaigning process, compromises on the president’s time and attention are so great that productivity decreases across certain powers and duties. However, evaluating the frequency that these are employed suggests quite the opposite; across multiple presidencies, the Executive is consistently more productive during the year before Election Day. This holds true for both political parties and across different levels of unity between Congress and the President

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 1:20pm - 1:40pm
016 Karpen Hall

1:40pm

Technology and Nature: Connections within the Greenhouse Aesthetic
Resource scarcity is a constant and recurring issue, addressed initially by artists reacting to the 1974 Energy Crisis and the Rachel Carson publication “Silent Spring.” Art movements of the 1970s lead to land based installation art and experiments with sustainable design methods. This study has coined the “greenhouse aesthetic” to describe the intersection of plant and human needs in art and architecture. Artists of the 70s, such as Hans Haacke created simplified organic-to-inorganic microclimate relationships and Alan Sonfist installed gardens of indigenous plants that represent the identity of New York’s native ecosystem. This mode of making is also mimicked by the Earthship architecture of Mike Reynolds, the designs of “Naturhus”, as well as contemporary artist Mark Dion’s constructed environment, “Neukom Vivarium.” Likewise, these interests continue into the twenty-first century with Amy Youngs creates technology designed for plants but maintained by human participation, allowing for positive human-to-plant interactions. Vaughn Bell facilitates spaces where human and plant experiences are mutually beneficial, through a shift in the viewer’s perspective. This paper identifies a philosophical from the 1970s to the present in artworks and architecture from immersive experiences in nature, or lessons of how destructive human actions are to nature and mutually beneficial nature-human experiences. This research blends visual and experiential analysis of art works and architecture with the history of greenhouse innovations to reveal the philosophical implications plant and microclimate oriented technology has on art, architecture, and design.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 1:40pm - 2:00pm
237 Owen Hall

1:40pm

Unimolecular elimination of HF/DF from CD3CD2CHF2
Chlorinated Halocarbons and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) have become synonymous with environmental destruction, ozone depletion and the greenhouse effect. CFCs were used in a variety of industrial processes. HCFCs (hydro chlorofluorocarbons) and HFCs (hydro fluorocarbons) became the interim replacements for CFCs when the Montreal Protocol banned them in 1987. However, these molecules have their own hazardous implications as greenhouse gases. For this reason HCFC and HFC compounds will be phased out by 2020 in developed countries and 2030 in developing nations. The cleanup or conversions of these molecules into feedstock are a major point of study. The experimental study of these numerous compounds to determine their degradation processes and how they react in the atmosphere has become vital to the preservation of the environment and the future of our planet. CD3CD2CHF2 is the focus of this research because it is a suitable model for many HFC’s that will be banned in 2020. Photolysis of CD3CD2I and CHF2I in Pyrex vessels with Hg2I2 using an ultraviolet lamp forms HgI2 and the CD3CD2 and CHF2 radicals that combine to produce chemically activated CD3CD2CHF2. Reaction vessels, over a range of pressures, contained approximately a 4:1.5 ratio of CD3CD2I and CHF2I were prepared. A Gas Chromatographer Mass Spectrometer was used for product analysis. The 1,2-DF elimination forms E-and Z-CD3CD=CHF favoring the E-isomer. The 1,1-HF elimination reaction forms the CD3CD2CF: carbene that may transfer a deuterium giving E-and Z-CD3CD=CDF also favoring the formation of the E at certain pressures. It was also found that not all carbene formed has the energy to undergo deuterium migration and subsequently stays in the unstable form that can be trapped with a scavenger The competition between the 1,2- and 1,1-HF/DF elimination, the results from DFT calculations for the various reaction channels, and the molecule’s carbene chemistry will be discussed.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 1:40pm - 2:00pm
123 Zeis Hall

1:40pm

Teaching Software Design Principles to Undergraduates by Creating Large-Scale Game Software
Our interdisciplinary team of computer science, new media, and physics majors will present our continuing work on the software development project presented last semester: an implementation of a board game using Java & the event-driven Java Swing graphics library. We are currently restructuring our project to use a more advanced, time-driven graphics framework called LibGDX. This will not only allow us to create a more advanced, animated game world, but will also provide seamless cross-platform support for Android, iOS, and all major desktop systems via the Java Runtime Environment and HTML5.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 1:40pm - 2:00pm
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

1:40pm

Fall and Winter Movement Patterns of Translocated Adult Sicklefin Redhorse (Moxostoma sp.) in the Oconaluftee River, North Carolina
The southeastern United States contains the most diverse freshwater fauna in North America. Although there is a great diversity within our local ecosystems of North Carolina, 26% of these species are federally or locally listed as imperiled. The Sicklefin Redhorse is currently an undescribed species of the genus Moxostoma, endemic to the Hiawassee and the Little Tennessee river basins of western North Carolina and northern Georgia. They are listed as a priority wildlife species of North Carolina with a state status of “significantly rare” and are expected to gain federal protection under the Endangered Species Act within the next year. Like many potamodromous fishes, the Sicklefin Redhorse population is at risk due to fragmentation due to stream impediments, habitat degradation, and restriction of natural home range. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of release site and individual variation on distance moved and home range size for adults that have been translocated into a river that is historically within its home range, but from which they have since been extirpated. Ten native Sicklefin Redhorse were collected from the Tuckasegee River, surgically implanted with radio transmitters, and translocated into the Oconaluftee River, a river that is historically within its home range, but from which they have since been extirpated. The fish were tracked individually using radio telemetry for six months. Movement patterns for newly translocated fish and seasonal patterns for females are comparable to patterns found for Sicklefin Redhorse within their current range. Although some fish moved extensively, the sedentary winter patterns observed in females is indicative that the habitat provided by the Oconaluftee may be suitable. Continued observation throughout the spawning season will help in fully determining suitability of the Oconaluftee river for the future restoration of this threatened species to its native home range.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 1:40pm - 2:00pm
014 Zeis Hall

1:40pm

Internationalization of Higher Education; a comparative case study between U.S. and Australian Universities.
Universities around the world tag their mission statements and initiatives with internationalization. Internationalization has become a major factor in every sector of the world, to ensure national security and to foster relationships between cultures so they may benefit from each other. This paper examines the many definitions of internationalization of higher education by comparing American universities with Australian universities. This paper examines how globalization is the key factor in enforcing internationalization of higher education programs in each country. In this paper, internationalization is comprised of three categories: international students, international faculty, and implementation of international programs. Two case studies were reviewed for their implementations of each U.S. and Australian university to determine how efficient and beneficial each university is in integrating internationalization.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 1:40pm - 2:00pm
016 Karpen Hall

1:40pm

What Could She Say?: The Problem of Female Silence in Ovid’s Metamorphoses
The sexual violence against women in Ovid’s Metamorphoses has been discussed at length through many different lenses. His vivid rape scenes have been transformed into translations of his narratives, from literary interpretations to paintings and sculptures, just as his female characters are transformed in his poetry. Ovid has been accused by many feminist scholars as being a misogynist, unable to understand or sympathize with his female audience or characters. Although the feminist lens is undoubtedly important to understanding Ovid’s work, this thesis posits that an historical grounding of the text is equally imperative. One key fact to consider is Ovid’s own silencing, through banishment and censorship by the dominant male figure of Caesar Augustus. Ovid’s silencing by Augustus mirrors the silencing of women in his work. The conservative Augustan culture and Ovid’s biography are important factors when looking at the tales of Daphne, Philomela, and the ivory girl, among others. We must also examine the methods Ovid uses to silence these women. A male’s voice, Ovid’s own, is used to describe these scenes which are found within long narratives of male discourse and fantasy. When examined within this context, this thesis contends that Ovid critiques such emphasis on the male perspective by using pervasive irony throughout his narratives. Read in this way, we see how in recounting the violence and silencing these women faced, he is able to give them a voice.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 1:40pm - 2:00pm
038 Karpen Hall

1:40pm

Redefining ‘ART’: Examining the Priorities of Riders of Asheville Redefines Transit Across Income Categories
A large swath of transit and sociological related research suggests that access to quality transit directly influences the mobility of underserved, impoverished communities. Southern poverty, particularly in the Mountain South, is particularly hard to remedy without access to affordable transit options that allow commuters to commute to work, keep jobs, and attend to their personal needs. Between 2009-2013, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, 20% of Asheville residents were below the poverty level. Asheville City maintains a bus transit service called ART: Asheville Redefines Transit and commissioned a survey in 2013 to collect feedback from bus riders. The purpose of this study is to take the City of Asheville’s analysis one step further using logistic regression techniques to find which improvements or desired improvements were most appreciated or needed by those who have an income below the poverty line and above the poverty line. This study finds that income level is a large determinant of ART ridership. However, there were no significant differences in priorities between commuters above and below the poverty line. The significance levels on desired improvements such as increased night service hours, rider safety, and reporting procedure were often below a P-level of 0.001. The findings from this statistical analysis suggest that ART can both increase ridership in low and high income categories while directly improving the lives of many who ride ART and depend on it for survival in Asheville.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 1:40pm - 2:00pm
033 Karpen Hall

1:40pm

Why This Reboot Matters
This study is an analysis of social media regarding the development of movies and the interaction of fans with the movie studio. Marvel Studios, a movie company that makes movies based on Marvel Comics, has taken the idea of connecting all of their movies together to resemble how comic books work and adapted it to the big screen. The objective of this study is to understand why other movie studios want to copy their ability to connect their films, how social media reflects Marvel Studios, and the significance of what character is being adapted. Since the studio is huge, this study will be focus on the deal between Marvel Studios and Sony to develop a Spider-Man movie. After an 8 weeks period, data gathered using HootSuite Pro, Keyhole, and Google Analytics will show the reaction of fans and follow the development of Marvel Studios now that they can use their most popular superhero. The study will further emphasize the understanding that connecting movies into one another is a feat that can only be performed in the age of social media and fans have to like the idea.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 1:40pm - 2:00pm
012 Karpen Hall

2:00pm

The Waters of Ancestral Time: The Art of Edouard Duval-Carrié
Water has been a common theme in Haitian artist Edouard Duval-Carrié’s work since the beginning of his artistic career. Through the connection to memory and identity, this element signifies the heart of culture and tradition of the African Diaspora. It is representative of West African spiritual values expressed though the religion of Vodou, as it is the space connecting the realms of the living and the spiritual. This paper will analyze the meaning and importance of this element to the history of displaced West Africans who came to the Americas through migrations of the slave trade. Through a close examination of water in select pieces from Duval-Carrié’s bodies of work, entitled “Divine Revolutions” and “Imagined Landscapes,” the unification of a diasporic identity and a strong bond to ancestry is created forming a unique cultural identity. This imagery will be examined through the lens of Vodou spirituality and traditions, and compared to contemporary artist María Magdalena Campos-Pons, who cultivates a similar visual dialogue of life in the Caribbean. Ancestral memory and identity become key roles in this portrayal of aquatic imagery and help to shed light on the cosmology and conceptualization of contemporary Caribbean life.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:00pm - 2:20pm
237 Owen Hall

2:00pm

IEEE SoutheastCon Hardware Competition
Robots and the uses for them are constantly advancing and evolving. One of the uses is the solving of puzzles. The objective of this research was to develop and build an autonomous robot for competition in the 2015 IEEE SoutheastCon Hardware Competition. Tasks included playing the game of Simon, drawing on an Etch-A-Sketch, rotating a Rubric Cube, and picking up a playing card.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:00pm - 2:20pm
125 Rhoades Robinson Hall

2:00pm

The Use of Stable-Isotope Analysis to Distinguish between Populations of the Northern Saw-whet Owl
The Northern Saw-whet Owl (Aegolius acadicus) is listed as a threatened species in North Carolina that occupies the high elevation habitats. Owls were captured using mist netting and an audio lure. Feather samples were collected from 20 individuals and sent to Colorado Plateau Stable Isotope Laboratory (CPSIL) for analysis. The isotope chosen for analysis was deuterium, an isotope of hydrogen with an additional neutron. Deuterium occurs naturally in precipitation and is incorporated into the food chain when absorbed through plant tissues. The concentrations of deuterium occur predictably depending on location. As organisms consume food and water, deuterium accumulates in their tissues; this occurs all the way through the food chain. By analyzing the feathers of the Northern Saw-whet Owl for this isotope, it should be possible to determine the location that the feathers were grown. This is done by matching the isotopic signatures found in the feathers to corresponding locations with similar isotopic signatures. If the study site supports both resident and migrant populations of the Northern Saw-whet Owl, as currently believed, a difference in the isotopic signatures should be apparent. These data will help to better inform conservation efforts of high elevation forest by providing a better understanding of habitat use by Saw-whet Owls. The results are pending as the feathers are currently being analyzed.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:00pm - 2:20pm
014 Zeis Hall

2:00pm

“Acts of Genocide”: Broadening the Western Concept of Genocide for Non-Western Conflicts, the Cases of Darfur and Rwanda
Genocide has been a controversial topic since its inception in 1944. Originally the construction of a single scholar, Raphael Lemkin, it has become a central concept in the analysis of many conflicts today. While variations off of Lemkin’s conceptualization abound, the international community typically uses the UN’s official definition of Genocide, written into the Convention of the Prevention and Punishment of Genocide in 1948. However, while this definition does cover a lot of Lemkin’s main points, the politics of the 1940’s prevailed in its formation, leading to a definition that leaves much to be accounted for. These issues range from whether cultural genocide is true genocide, if genocide is only a state crime or if it can be committed by non-state actors, and arguments about the choice of protected groups: racial, “ethnical”, religious, or cultural groups being the only ones protected. While these issues are varied, they share a central theme: Western concepts, as in group identity, definition of a “state”, and the illegitimacy of culture death. The roots of this Westernization is understandable when the construction of the Definition is analyzed. However, this Western construct is anachronistic which defies modern manifestations of genocide. This paper will analyze the Westernized construction of genocide and how it leads to the discounting of non-Western genocidal conflicts. This in turn leads to the lack of protection for groups currently experiencing an unrecognized genocide perpetrated against them, as well as allowing the orchestrators of the genocide to escape unpunished. This directly refutes the goals of the UN’s Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide. Using Rwanda and Darfur as case-studies, this paper contends that non-Western conflicts do not always fit into the constructed labels of the West.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:00pm - 2:20pm
016 Karpen Hall

2:00pm

Nine Companions: Examining Loyalty Beyond Logic in J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Fellowship of the Ring
J.R.R. Tolkien fought in the trenches in one of the most horrific battles of WWI: the Battle of the Somme. He lost many close friends in the in the war, which may have affected the way he viewed concepts like loyalty. In addition, scholars agree that Beowulf- an epic in which loyalty is a key theme- influenced Tolkien as well. His focus on loyalty is very different from his more pessimistic modernist contemporaries because he chooses to focus on the ability of good to overcome evil in the end through friendship and loyalty this thesis examines these dynamics in The Fellowship of the Ring. Some critics claim that Tolkien’s views are simplistic; but Tolkien knows, better than most, what darkness and despair look like and chooses to take a more positive outlook and focus on themes like strength, courage, and friendship


Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:00pm - 2:20pm
038 Karpen Hall

2:00pm

Creating Value in Community Collaborations: Potential for Student Engagement in Community Food Projects
The number and popularity of projects calling for local food production and food justice is increasing rapidly in Asheville.  In the community, several projects build community and increase access to fresh, affordable, and healthy food.  On campus, many professors and students are also involved in projects and coursework related to local food and food justice, and the demand for service opportunities and coursework is growing rapidly.  This project explores the benefits and barriers of campus-community collaborations surrounding local food and food justice projects.  Using the community engaged participatory model, the researcher built relationships and has been actively involved in projects both on campus and in the community.  The final product is a qualitative survey of the needs, struggles, perspectives, and accomplishments of community leaders, both on and off campus.  The following key result emerged: a reliable and consistent bridge is essential for valuable educational experiences both on campus and in the community.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:00pm - 2:20pm
033 Karpen Hall

2:00pm

Unraveling the Cinematic Future of Spider-Man as the Character Finds a New Home at Marvel Studios
This research paper offers an analysis of social media and the responses to the campaign circulating around Marvel Studios' acquisition of the Spider-Man property film rights as well as how the studio is planning on handling the character as it pertains to the studio's cinematic universe. This study encompasses how the public responds to the various hashtags and rumors that have emerged from the campaign by examining the growth of knowledge communities. Through this research, the evolution of the campaign to relocate the character to a new studio will be explored by analyzing the contributors of the campaign, including journalists, news outlets and their followers. Data were collected from multiple resources for the #WelcomeHomeSpidey campaign for six weeks using Hootsuite Pro, Sentiment140 and SocialBakers, online social media analytic tools. This study broadens the literature on how social media analytics influence content creation by following a news event as it breaks and how social media reacts to the information. The analytics explored within this study revolve around the reach of the news, the engagement set up by journalists and their followers, the share of voice present between the social media platforms and the sentiment analysis recorded and aggregated in response to the development of the campaign.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:00pm - 2:20pm
012 Karpen Hall

2:20pm

Pioneering the Fog: The Dialogue of Fujiko Nakaya’s “Veil” and The Philip Johnson Glass House
Pioneering the Fog: The Dialogue of Fujiko Nakaya’s “Veil” and The Philip Johnson Glass House

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:20pm - 2:40pm
237 Owen Hall

2:20pm

Decline of Traditional Food Systems in Cherokee, North Carolina

Environmental anthropology examines the relationship between humans and the environment, emphasizing the idea that culture is partly the outward expression of a need to maintain homeostasis. According to this view, cultures develop over the course of generations in part to maintain ecological balance through sustainable resource use. The traditional food production system of the Cherokee Indians, which has sustained the Cherokee people for thousands of years, exemplifies the importance of cultural tradition in ensuring the long-term survival of a population. In the years since Western contact, however, a shift in Cherokee food ways has accelerated, threatening not only a rich cultural tradition, but also the food security of the Cherokee community, the crop biodiversity of southern Appalachian agroecosystems, and the ability of an increasingly tenuous global food system to provide for an expanding population. Geographic displacement, forced acculturation, and a culturally appropriative tourist industry, all products of an institutionalized system of racial oppression, are identified as three significant modern barriers to traditional agricultural practice in Cherokee. The environmental detriments that stem from this agricultural decline thus substantiate the idea that culture and environment are closely intertwined, and that sudden upheaval of a deeply rooted indigenous society will inevitably disrupt the delicate environmental equilibrium had been previously sustained by traditional culture and generations of collective ecological knowledge.


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Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:20pm - 2:40pm
014 Zeis Hall

2:20pm

People, Palates, and Places: An Exploration of Urban, Suburban, and Rural Local Food Perceptions in the Mountain South
Emerging research suggests that urban and rural areas experience food systems, local food access, and food deserts in different ways. The purpose of this research study was to investigate how perceptions of local foods vary across urban, suburban, and rural areas in the Appalachian region of North and South Carolina. The study utilized a cross-sectional design with a convenience sample of 54 adult participants recruited and surveyed after their visits to their local health department and/or social service department.  The instrument was a 10-minute verbal and written questionnaire. Key questions focused on perceptions of local foods and local food movements, shopping habits and decision-making, and desired changes.  Across all regions, over 85% of participants said they would choose the local product over the non-local product when price was the same. A higher proportion of participants in rural areas were very likely to purchase local foods even when they were more expensive than participants from other areas.  When asked what they think of when they hear local foods, the majority of participants reported benefits to the local economy and farmers, as well as knowing where the food comes from.  The findings suggest that people in rural and in urban areas are more likely to have positive attitudes toward local foods compared to those in suburban areas.  This research will inform local foods promotion and will be translated into an educational video based on the findings, incorporating audio recordings and photos from the study.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:20pm - 2:40pm
033 Karpen Hall

2:25pm

Religion and Reality: Literature and Prophecy in the Fiction of Flannery O’Connor
In 1960 Flannery O’Connor published her second and final novel, The Violent Bear it Away. Like O’Connor’s other works, the novel is steeped in religious themes and symbolism. It centers around Francis Tarwater, a young man who struggles between two conflicting destinies: that of a prophet and that of an educated secular man. At its publication, the novel was not nearly as well-received by critics or general audiences as O’Connor’s other works. The violent nature of the novel and the depiction of “backwoods fundamentalists,” as literary critic William Shea calls them, turned many readers off. Scholars have been examining the religious nature of O’Connor’s work for decades, and the reception of this novel was particularly polarizing. Although virtually all critics agree that O’Connor’s work was heavily influenced by her position as a devout Roman Catholic living in the Protestant South, O’Connor’s letters indicate, and critics such as Karl Martin agree, that the connection goes deeper than that. This thesis examines the ways in which O'Connor viewed herself as a kind of literary prophet by comparing the grotesquerie of the fictional Francis Tarwater with the reality of O’Connor’s own life.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:25pm - 2:45pm
038 Karpen Hall

2:25pm

Wrestling With The Company’s Narrative: The Anatomy of a Social Media Knowledge Community in the Buildup to Wrestlemania 31
This project examines the conversations of a heavily active online forum during the weeks leading to the biggest professional wrestling event of the year, specifically in regard to the headlining match. It provides a day-by-day analysis of what discussions are had by the fan base on an unofficial platform in the six weeks before WrestleMania 31. This study seeks to explain the unique vocabulary and online culture of the fan base. As the major event approaches and interest builds, the paper investigates the success or lack thereof of WWE in keeping its audience “in line” with what they are trying to promote, what the company does when rumors, speculation, and spoilers take on a life of their own, and how much the so-called “vocal minority” of online die-hard fans actually influences decision making. This analysis sheds light on the conversations being had on unofficial channels, and the ongoing balancing act between content producers and their audience. 

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:25pm - 2:45pm
012 Karpen Hall

2:25pm

Synthesis of Monolayer Graphene on Alpha Silicon Carbide Using Infrared LASER Ablation
This presentation will focus on the development of our ongoing research regarding the growth of graphene on alpha silicon carbide using infrared laser ablation. We will discuss enhancements made to the experimental procedure of graphene synthesis, which are based on additional experimental data and recently published research in this area. Our changes include the introduction of an argon gas flow as well as shortened ablation time intervals. We will include analysis and results for a range of samples incorporating these additions. The continuing aim of this research is to isolate the optimal temperature and time exposure which will produce a monolayer of graphene growth using this method.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:25pm - 2:45pm
123 Zeis Hall

2:30pm

Cross-Species Induction of Antibacterial Compounds Produced by Interaction of Pseudomonas stutzeri Against Invading Microorganisms
New avenues for drug discovery are in demand due to increasing amounts of drug-resistant bacterial strains. Although multidrug resistant bacteria have become an increasing global threat, the discovery of new antibiotics with novel mechanisms of action has slowed over the last 20 years. Co-culturing bacteria strains is a relatively new method to induce the production of novel antibacterial natural products that can be isolated for further research. Combining diverse bacteria may influence expression of secondary metabolite antibiotics unseen in standard laboratory conditions. The aim of this project is to co-culture the known producer, Pseudomonas stutzeri, and unidentified soil bacteria to elicit the production of small molecule natural products with antibiotic activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The small molecules will then be isolated and characterized using 1H and 13C NMR, IR, and mass spectrometry. To date, various culture conditions have been explored to achieve optimal growth for both bacteria strains in the combined setting. An environment promoting co-cultured bacteria will lead to secondary metabolite production and the discovery of active compounds that inhibit S. aureus and E. coli proliferation.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Wilma Sherrill Center Grimes Atrium

2:30pm

Density Functional Theory of Carbon – Carbon Bond Cleavage Reactions on a Stepped and Planar Rhodium Catalyst Surfaces
With the increasing dependence on fossil fuels, more sustainable fuel sources are needed to keep up with this high demand along with reducing fossil fuel dependence. Fuel cells are just one of the capable methods to efficiently generate energy. Fuel cells use hydrogen and oxygen gas reactions to form water and produce electricity that is able to be used as energy. The required hydrogen gas must be generated from hydrogen containing molecules in order to support the alternative fuel source. Sustainable hydrogen gas generation is possible by using a dehydrogenation reaction to break down carbohydrates, alcohols and other biomolecules that are found in plant material. This reaction uses a metal catalyst to facilitate the breaking of C-C, C-H and O-H bonds contained in different compounds. Previous research by Dana Clark investigated mechanisms for C-C bond cleavage of different hydrocarbons and alcohols reacting on a model planar rhodium catalyst surface using density functional theory (DFT) computational methods. However, the experimental metal catalyst is not perfectly planar and contains a variety of steps and kinks along the catalyst surface. This project focuses on the C-C bond cleavage reactions of hydrocarbons and alcohols over a stepped lattice surface using DFT to compare to mechanisms over a planar catalyst surface to gain an enhanced understanding of the reactivity of experimental catalysts for dehydrogenation.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Wilma Sherrill Center Grimes Atrium

2:30pm

Experimental Determination of the Competitive Unimolecular Elimination Rates from CD3CHFCl
Ozone-depleting substances (ODS), initiated by Chlorinated Halocarbons (CFCs), have been a major focus within the scientific community. CFCs are chemical compounds used as refrigerants, cleaning solvents, foam-blowing agents, and aerosol propellants that destroy atmospheric ozone and contribute to global warming when they release atomic chlorine. CFCs were completely phased out by the Montreal Protocol in 1995 due to their environmental destruction and were replaced with hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs). Despite the improvement that HFCs and HCFCs offer, they are scheduled to be phased out by 2020 in developed countries and 2030 in developing countries, as they are still harmful greenhouse gases. For this phase-out to occur, steps have been initiated to cleanup and convert these compounds into useful feedstocks. The research being presented here focuses on determining the degradation processes that HFCs and HCFCs undergo so that their reaction mechanism within the atmosphere is understood. By understanding the degradation process, vital steps can be taken to cleanup and convert these compounds into useful feedstocks with minimal environmental impacts. This research focuses on the HCFC model system CD3CHFCl, which exhibits competitive 1,1 and 1,2 elimination mechanisms. Preliminary results indicate that XCl elimination (X=H,D) is more energetically favored over XF elimination by an approximate factor of 3.5. Additionally, 1,1 elimination accounts for approximately 20% of all observed reaction pathways and is more energetically favored than originally expected based upon theory. Furthermore, the product branching fractions were found to be 0.61, 0.28, 0.08 and 0.03 for 1,2-DCl, 1,1-HCl, 1,2-DF and 1,1-HF elimination, respectively.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Wilma Sherrill Center Grimes Atrium

2:30pm

Hydrogeochemistry of the Etowah Bog
The Etowah Bog is home to several endangered species, one of which is Sarracenia purpurea, also known as the purple pitcher plant. This bog located in Etowah, NC is also known as the McClure bog and has undergone many management projects in order to maintain the site. Factors that are responsible for creating and maintaining these communities are not well known but hydrology and water quality are factors found useful to study in order to learn what makes these environments successful. This study researches the ions present in water samples around the bog in order to understand the water quality from different sources to learn how each source affects the environment. Current results are from data collected in December of 2014 and show small patterns in the ions present. Further research needs to be done to increase data from the different water sources to determine effects on the environment on the environment.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Wilma Sherrill Center Grimes Atrium

2:30pm

Hydrological Analysis of Hyder Pasture Bog Restoration
The goal of this research project is to elucidate the water chemistry of the Hyder Pasture Bog in Henderson County, North Carolina. The Hyder Pasture Bog is one of the sites encompassed by the Mountain Bogs National Wildlife Refuge program launched by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS); this program was developed in order to protect, restore, and manage the bog sites, reduce habitat fragmentation, protect and/or improve water quality, and stimulate conservation habits. The wetlands of Hyder Pasture serve as home for Sagittaria fasciculate (bunched arrowhead), which is an endangered species found exclusively in Henderson County, NC and Greenville County, SC; the plants are relatively small in size and boast white flowers between May and July. Wolf Creek Engineering is carrying out the restoration of Hyder Pasture to hopefully increase the growth of the bunched arrowhead plants on site. Samples were collected shortly after snowfall in February from four streams, two wells, and one culvert on the property; samples were analyzed for K+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, NO3-, Cl-, SO42-, and HCO3- using ion chromatography and alkalinity titrations. The samples from streams nearest the road showed high concentrations of Na+ and Cl-, indicating the presence of dissolved road salt in ground water. Subsequent samples will be taken during the restoration process and after it is completed in order to sufficiently analyze the water chemistry of the Hyder Pasture Bog and determine the ideal environment for the bunched arrowhead species.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Wilma Sherrill Center Grimes Atrium

2:30pm

Phenstatin analogues with non-aromatic attachments in place of the B-ring
Phenstatin derivatives are cancer-fighting analogues of the naturally occurring molecules colchicine and combretastatin (CA-4). These species of molecules are able to bind to alpha- and beta-receptors of microtubules to halt cell division. Some research groups have observed that adding a phenothiazine in place of the A-ring and an indole in location of the B-ring increased anti-cancer activity. Recent studies of phenstatin derivatives containing phenothiazine and indole functionalities have shown that size and torsional strain affect the toxicity towards cancer cells and the molecules ability to attach to microtubulin. This research focuses on attaching a phenothiazine molecule in location of the A-ring and different sized non-aromatic rings in place of the B-ring to determine if strain and size affect binding to the microtubule surface.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Wilma Sherrill Center Grimes Atrium

2:30pm

Quantification of Clay Minerals in North Carolina Soil via X-Ray Diffraction

Groundwater contamination from agricultural runoff and residential wastewater is a growing environmental threat.  Common veterinary and human medications, pesticides, fertilizers and other environmental contaminates often make their way into local rivers and streams through septic system leakage, surface runoff, and treated wastewater disposal. The ultimate fate of pharmaceuticals, fertilizers, pesticides, and personal care products in surface and groundwater depends on several factors, including the surrounding vegetation and soil composition. Electrostatic interactions between soil minerals and ionized compounds cause certain contaminates to have a higher affinity for specific soils, affecting the adsorption and relative mobility of contaminates in the environment. Therefore, understanding the mineral composition of soil is vital to predicting the fate of environmental contaminates, like pharmaceuticals, in local ecosystems. X-Ray powder diffraction is a characterization technique that helps to identify which minerals are present in a soil, however determining the weight percentage of the minerals is not a trivial task. Several methods have been proposed for quantifying XRD data using an internal standard as a matrix flushing agent. This study attempts to quantify the clay minerals in Western North Carolina soils using X-Ray powder diffraction and a reference intensity ratio analytical method. 


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Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Wilma Sherrill Center Grimes Atrium

2:30pm

Rate Determination of 1,1 vs.1,2-HCl Elimination from 1,1-Dichloropropane
Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) have become ubiquitous in the chemical industry and in many commercial operations since they replaced chlorofluorocarbons. The Montreal Protocol requires HCFCs to be phased out by 2030 worldwide. Therefore HCFCs need to be discarded and destroyed or converted into useful feedstock. Methods to destroy HCFCs include pyrolysis, combustion, incineration, catalytic destruction, and hydrolysis. Converting HCFCs into feedstock is the preferred method because HCFCs contain valuable C-F bond that are manufactured at high costs. Computational models have been developed to evaluate the synthetic utility of potential conversion processes of halocarbons to commercially feasible materials. However, for these calculations of complex kinetic schemes to be reliable, accurate kinetic parameters are needed for all decomposition pathways available to HCFCs. Degradation mechanisms of HCFCs include: interchange, stabilization and elimination (1,1 HX and 1,2 HX). The 1,1-HX elimination pathway has not been widely studied. Therefore the ratio in which each elimination reaction contributes to the formation of a carbene is unknown for most HCFCs. A better understanding of the degradation pathways will allow computational models of converting HCFCs into chemical feedstock to be more reliable. This research focuses on the model compound 1,1-dichloropropane and will determine ratios of the molecule’s degradation pathways. Preliminary data has shown that the 1,2 HCl elimination pathway generates more carbene by 5 fold for the cis isomer and 8 fold for the trans isomer, when compared against the 1,1-HCl elimination pathway. In addition, the rate for the formation of cis-1,dichloropropene in both pathways is greater than the rate of formation of trans-1,dichloropropene.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Wilma Sherrill Center Grimes Atrium

2:30pm

Screens of Streptomyces griseus for the Production of Natural Product Antibiotics
The emergence of multidrug resistant bacteria requires new antibiotics to be continually be developed. The actinobacteria are an order of bacteria that have been well documented as antibiotic producers in response to competition mediated environmental stress. This study uses mixed cultures of the actinobacterium Streptomyces griseus and a number of unknown bacteria isolated from pitcher plants in DuPont Forest to screen for antibiotic production. Biological assays were employed to test for the inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli growth around the bacterial mixed cultures and each individual unknown bacterium. Work is still being done to find the optimal medium to perform the antibiotic screening assays on. A few bacterial cultures appear to inhibit the growth of S. aureus and E. coli, and the isolation and molecular structure of these antibiotic molecules are still being investigated.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Wilma Sherrill Center Grimes Atrium

2:30pm

Superefficient Power Transmission with High Temperature Superconduction
Development of practical materials for the purpose of transmitting electricity without resistance is problematic. The solid structure properties that support superconductivity are not well understood. One school of thought relates superconductivity to a status of magnetic ordering within layers of the crystal lattice. The recently discovered high temperature superconductor BaFe2As2 is interesting because it contains iron, which is known to have strong natural magnetic properties that ordinarily destroy superconductivity. BaFe2As2 is also curious in that it demonstrates superconductivity when altered by electron enrichment but, it is not a superconducting material without such alteration. BaFe2As2 undergoes changes in its crystal lattice structure when its temperature is lowered below 140 K. Below this structural change point it has been observed to have magnetic orderings which have been difficult to determine. The following research project will attempt to elucidate the magnetic order states of BaFe2As2 for a contribution to the understanding of high temperature superconductivity. The previously obtained Mossbauer spectra of crystalline BaFe2As2 below 140 K demonstrated a convoluted spectrum, thus does not provide a clear image of what the magnetic ordering states are. We will attempt to de-convolute the spectra by subtracting a spectrum of powdered material from the crystal material.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Wilma Sherrill Center Grimes Atrium

2:30pm

Synthesis and Isolation of 5,6,7-Trimethoxy Indoles for Binding Diverse Functional Groups at the 3-Position of the Indole to Make Novel Combretastatin Derivatives
Combretastatin A4 (CA4) is an effective chemotherapeutic drug that works by inhibiting tubulin formation; this in turn slows the rate of cell proliferation and deforms the cells of tumors’ vasculature systems. Deformation of these cells blocks blood flow to the tumor, consequentially starving and killing it. Due to CA4’s efficacy against various cancer cell lines (as well as problems with the drug such as its low water solubility), further investigations into derivatives of the drug are being pursued. A common thread among these derivatives is the utilization of an indole ring, probably due to the high biological activity of indoles and their use in a broad range of pharmaceuticals. Past researchers of the Holt research group identified a need to substitute a trimethoxy indole at the 2-position in place of CA4’s trimethoxy benzene ring. Due to the prominence of indoles in nature with substitution at the 3-position, CA4 indole derivatives similar to those in nature, are being pursued utilizing halogenation, coupling and hydrogenation reactions.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Wilma Sherrill Center Grimes Atrium

2:30pm

Synthesis and Modification of Spiromastixone I and the Spriomastixone Central Ring
Depsidones are tricyclic natural products with a wide range of known antibacterial properties. The Spiromastix sp. fungus was recently found in the deep sea near Japan and has been found to produce 15 new depsidone molecules known collectively as Spiromastixones A-O. The main goals of this research are to first successfully synthesize the backbone of depsidone molecules and then to experiment with modifications to the central ring and its substituents. The first reaction of the backbone synthesis, which involved the addition of catechol, benzyl bromide, and potassium carbonate in acetonitrile, produced the desired benzyl protected catechol in 19% yield. The success of this reaction was confirmed by 1H-NMR data. This product was then esterified with 2-bromobenzoic acid in 0.1M acetic anhydride under reflux conditions. Experiments have been completed on a combination of the first two reactions to increase product yields, and 1H-NMR data is currently being collected for confirmation. Later experiments include the total synthesis of Spiromastixone I and investigation of the modification of the aromatic ring substituents.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Wilma Sherrill Center Grimes Atrium

2:30pm

The Chemistry of Artificial Sweeteners
Artificial Sweeteners are considered to be sugar substitutes that are often sweeter and have either no calories or fewer calories than sugar. Artificial sweeteners can be either completely synthesized from smaller molecules or prepared via relatively slight chemical modification of naturally occurring substances. Artificial sweeteners provide advantages such as weight loss and diabetes control. The use of artificial sweeteners as an option for diabetes control is a topic that has struck some interest. These artificial sweeteners also carry some disadvantages such as lack of nutritional value, and side effects that include mood swings, headaches, fatigue, and dizziness. Some of these commonly known artificial sweeteners are sucralose, saccharin, acesulfame potassium, aspartame, and neotame. The artificial sweetener neotame has become the sweetener of most interest because of the structure similarity that it shares with aspartame. The main focus is to compare the structures and chemical properties of these artificial sweeteners as well as their chemical syntheses to gain a better understanding of the correlation between their chemical properties and their use as sweeteners.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Wilma Sherrill Center Grimes Atrium

2:30pm

The New Chemistry: Solutions for the 21st Century
Over the centuries, Chemistry has fostered both incredible and numerous innovations, but in the past, the focus of Chemistry has always been in creating new products, increasing existing product yields, and increasing profits. However, this focus never addressed the factors and side effects which led to the myriad of challenges humans now face -- climate change, oceanic acidification, toxic waste, air pollution, and more. Industry, Academia, and the Government are finally beginning to agree: the Earth is not immune to the chemicals we use, and so we must transform the way we practice and teach Chemistry, or we must face the consequences. The “New” Chemistry is a more holistic approach that involves using nontoxic reagents and products, a greater accountability of long-term product affects, and innovative syntheses that minimize or eliminate material and energy waste. This plan demonstrates how New Chemistry can be integrated into our undergraduate laboratories and lecture programs, provide students with a more competitive edge in the workforce, further incentivize undergraduate work in sustainable synthesis, and help serve as a solution to many of the increasingly complex challenges humanity faces. It also explores the establishment of “The New Chemistry Toolkit”, which will provide students and professors with an open source of toxicological information, alternative chemistry metrics, and alternative solvents and reagent database to use with their own research and projects. We will apply New Chemistry metrics on a few current syntheses taught in our undergraduate laboratories in order to demonstrate and evaluate the true efficacy of New Chemistry syntheses, which establishes a starting point used for the stepwise redesign of current undergraduate chemistry courses

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Wilma Sherrill Center Grimes Atrium

2:30pm

Understanding Nanoparticle Toxicity; a Public Health Concern
Nanotechnology is a growing field that represents a large industrial market with many industrial and private uses. Nanoparticles are known to cause toxicity in biological environments, with reactivity increased proportionally to surface area. Early evidence would suggest that, no matter the composition of the nanoparticle chemically, once the nano-scale is reached it is likely to be toxic. This evidence seems to contradict current nanoparticle theory which suggests a chemical mechanism for nanotoxicity. The focus of this research will be to develop an alternative explanation. It is likely that toxic effects are caused by the presence of trapped electrons in defects on the nanoparticle surface. To test this theory, carbon nanotubes with varying amounts of defects are to be procured and analyzed using Raman spectroscopy and Electron Spin Resonance. The presence of defects should correlate with the amount of electrons trapped in a nanoparticle surface. Samples will also be tested using Thermally Induced Luminescence. If the nanoparticles are seen to emit photons at biological temperatures, it can be safely assumed that the samples are reactive in a biological system. The toxicity of these samples will then be tested on live specimens in collaboration with other universities. This work is of critical importance due the amount of environmental exposure to nanoparticle pollution encountered by the general public. The implications of this research could theoretically lead to the development of methods which control the number of trapped electrons in a nanoparticle surface to negate toxic effects in materials such as asbestos.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Wilma Sherrill Center Grimes Atrium

2:30pm

Using Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles to Remove Caffeine from Water
The removal of pharmaceuticals from the potable water supply is an issue that impacts all humans. Research that identifies the most effective and lowest-energy methods to purify water is of critical significance. 15nm diameter Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) were used as a medium to filter aqueous 5.0ppm caffeine solution, and the filtered samples were analyzed via UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The results showed a decrease in absorbance at 273nm (caffeine peak) when compared to the 5.0ppm standard solution, suggesting that the TiO2 NPs were successful at removing some of the caffeine from the water samples. Future research will focus on the ability of TiO2 NPs to react with other organic molecules, and detecting through which specific functional groups interaction occurs.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Wilma Sherrill Center Grimes Atrium

2:30pm

Numerically Approximating Evapotranspiration Rates in Mountain Bogs
Using a dataset for water table fluctuations in wetlands and a basic equation for the evapotranspiration rates, evapotranspiration rates are estimated with MATLAB by approximating and averaging the nightly rise in water levels and daily net change in water levels. The data for these fluctuations depicts a sharp decrease in water table levels during the daylight hours, when phreatophytic vegetation transpiration rates and evaporation rates are high. The water level increase during nighttime hours is due to low evapotranspiration levels and a somewhat constant flow of groundwater into the water table. The specific yield refers to the sensitivity of water table levels to changes in water volume in the area. After eliminating data affected by recent rainfall, a set of slopes for nightly recovery rates and for net daily water level changes is estimated for each day and averaged together for monthly approximations. Assuming the area’s specific yield is one and using the previously discussed averaged values, monthly approximations for evapotranspiration rates are calculated.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:30pm - 4:30pm
Wilma Sherrill Center Concourse

2:45pm

The Riace Bronze Warriors: Understanding Their Exceptional Form, Problematic Discovery, and Indistinct Provenience
In August of 1972, two life-like ancient bronze statues were pulled from the seafloor off the coast of the southern Italian region of Calabria. Since the discovery of the Riace Bronzes, as they are now known, there has been much scholarly debate surrounding their manufacture, provenience, form, and, above all, the circumstances of their deposition at sea. Through exploration of the statues’ characteristics in comparison to other known sculptures of the ancient world, scholars place the creation of these pieces in the early Classical Greek context (480-450 BCE). This paper reviews the scholarly debate and argues for an association with the workshop of the famous 5th century sculptor Phidias. It also suggests that the military presentation of the statues strongly indicates their original inclusion within a larger group of sculptures formerly situated in a commemorative monument at Delphi. This paper’s approach to resolving their unknown past involves an examination of what little physical evidence exists in their discovery, as well as the lack of evidence with respect to their transport and former physical situation. Further research offers a premise for the reason for their oversea transport, which is Roman imperialism and conquest. By connecting and synthesizing historical texts and modern scholarship, this paper uses archaeological methodology as a means to resolve many of the problematic aspects surrounding the bronzes, from creation and original context to their ancient loss and subsequent discovery.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:45pm - 3:05pm
237 Owen Hall

2:45pm

“The Soil is Bad for Certain Kinds of Flowers”: Dominant Cultural Narratives and the Impact of Community in Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye
In The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison, readers are immediately confronted with an American ideal: “Here is the house. It is green and white. It has a door. It is very pretty. Here is the family. Mother, Father, Dick, and Jane live in the green-and-white house. They are very happy.” By forcing readers to immediately examine this ideal life, Morrison encourages us to compare this life with the reality of the Breedloves and the MacTeers—two families struggling to find themselves illustrated in this picture-perfect life. My thesis explores themes including the influence of community on the individual, the dangers of imposing dominant cultural narratives, the impact of racial shame, and the cyclical nature of self-hatred that is present not only in the novel, but also in society. I posit that it is because of their higher social class that Claudia and Frieda MacTeer are able to stave off the madness that comes so quickly for Pecola Breedlove. Because the MacTeers are part of a beloved community, the repercussions of dominant cultural narratives without counter-narratives are lessened. This is juxtaposed by the Breedlove family, who lives in isolation and is part of no such community. The cyclical, inherited nature of self-hatred present in the Breedlove family is not an inherent behavior, but a learned one. Moreover, by exploring these themes in the novel I draw connections to our contemporary lives, questioning what this text means to modern readers


Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:45pm - 3:05pm
038 Karpen Hall

2:45pm

Ross McElwee’s monstrous progeny in an era of nuclear weapons proliferation
This paper examines the intersection of personal documentary and the essay film in the eye/“I” of Ross McElwee’s camera. These modes of cinematic expression are linked to Alexandre Astruc’s notion of the caméra­stylo, or the “camera­pen,” and to Agnès Varda’s related notion of cinécriture, or “cinema as writing,” which calls for an authorial and wholly personal approach to filmmaking. Teeming with candid digressions and curious excrescences, cinécriture carries forward the loose, essayistic legacy of Michel de Montaigne. Ross McElwee, along with Agnès Varda, Jonas Mekas, and Ed Pincus, helped pioneer first­person filmmaking, infusing their works with intimate reflections on their own lives and the filmmaking process. In effect, they embody Montaigne’s famous declaration “I am myself the matter of my book,” yet they often demonstrate profound humility in baring their souls. McElwee’s first feature, Sherman’s March: A Meditation on the Possibility of Romantic Love in the South During an Era of Nuclear Weapons Proliferation, shows the filmmaker working very much in the same vein as Montaigne in his Essays; both men approach their personal demons in the aftermath of great loss under the pretense of discussing historical figures. Thus, each author-as-subject emerges reflexively as one and the same with the eponymous object of study, engendering, as Lawrence Kritzman notes, a narrative self or self-as-other to compensate for life’s deficiencies. Linking the essayistic impulse to an erotic, procreative impulse, Kritzman underlines the vital force of the creative process, as well as its potential to aid in self-therapy. In this paper, I apply a similar framework to Sherman’s March. I argue that, through a Montaignian conception of the narrative self, McElwee attempts to cope with feelings of inadequacy in personal and professional life by sublimating them into spectacle and the protean enactment of subjectivity which is the essence of the essay film.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:45pm - 3:05pm
012 Karpen Hall

2:45pm

A Study of the Occurrence of Convex Sets Among Points in the Plane
In 1935 Esther Klein proposed the following question to two of her colleagues, Paul Erdős and George Szekeres: How many points in general position are necessary to guarantee a set of four points that define a convex quadrilateral? This was quickly proven to be five. The generalization of this problem, known as The Happy Ending Problem, has been far more difficult to prove. The basic question is, how many points in general position are necessary to guarantee a set of n points that define a convex n-gon? Erdős and Szekeres were able to prove such a number exists for all n, although an exact value is only known for n less than or equal to six. In researching this problem we have focused on determining combinatorically the minimum number of convex quadrilaterals defined by any number of points in general position.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:45pm - 3:05pm
123 Zeis Hall

2:45pm

Lead Poisoning in Raptors
Lead exposure is one of the leading causes of sickness and death in raptors caused by humans. The scientific literature examining this issue has found a positive correlation between big game hunting season and blood lead levels in birds such as turkey vultures, common ravens, bald eagles, and the California condor. Lead ammunition, which is fragmented and dispersed throughout much of the target animal upon impact, is thought to be the source of this issue. Birds that scavenge on the discarded remains will ingest bits of the lead ammunition. Lead poisoning in turn can cause symptoms such as weakness, refusal to eat, lack of muscle coordination, fatigue, and death in severe cases. A study conducted on bald eagles in Wyoming concluded that switching to non-lead ammunition will reduce the number of birds affected by lead poisoning. This film examines the issue at hand and what is being done to help birds that are found with high blood lead levels. We met with the people from the Carolina Raptor Center and Wild for Life, who come in contact with birds affected by lead poisoning on a regular basis. The film highlights the reason lead poisoning is occurring, what can be done, and our moral obligation to nature as human beings.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 2:45pm - 3:30pm
014 Zeis Hall

3:00pm

Improvements in Health Literacy in the CooperRiis Community
Current research demonstrates the importance of considering health literacy, or the ability of individuals to understand basic health information, in order to design physical health promotion materials for a particular audience. Incorporating awareness of health literacy levels can improve access to care, enhance learning, and inform decision making. The purpose of this project was to improve the health literacy of multiple documents and create new materials for CooperRiis Community Work and Service orientations, volunteer and intern orientations, and Family Education Day. Organizational needs and preferences for material design were discussed with CooperRiis and the materials were enhanced and created utilizing evidence-based health literacy guides and literature. The materials will be utilized in the future to assist with the transitions of residents, volunteers, and interns into the CooperRiis Community as well as to better inform the residents' families on the importance of community work and engagement in the healing community setting.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 3:00pm - 3:20pm
410 Wilma Sherrill Center

3:05pm

Defending John Steinbeck: Morality, Philosophy, and Sentimentality in East of Eden
John Steinbeck’s novel East of Eden was published in 1952. Intended to be his magnum opus, the book received largely mixed reviews upon its release. The New York Times called it, “Clumsy in structure and defaced by excessive melodramatics and much cheap sensationalism,” and literary critic Arthur Mizener claimed that, with this novel, “[Steinbeck’s] insight and talent cease to work and he writes like the author of any third-rate best-seller.” Steinbeck’s literary reputation has long-suffered from reviews such as these, as well as from the accusation that he is a sentimentalist with a penchant for moralizing ethos which endows his work with ephemeral value. My thesis uses East of Eden to defend Steinbeck’s literary reputation. By analyzing Steinbeck’s exploration of the universal theme of good and evil, as well as his assertion that man may choose his own morality, I argue that East of Eden is representative of Steinbeck’s best work and his true capability as a writer. I also contest the accusation that East of Eden is an imperfectly structured novel with an inconsistent theme; I inspect the character of Cathy Ames Trask and through her, argue that Steinbeck’s structure for the novel is very intentional, and that his development of Cathy is not a contradictory element. Finally, my thesis evaluates the above-mentioned motifs to argue that sentimentality is not a detrimental quality to Steinbeck’s work, and that deep human emotion, such as is found in East of Eden, should be celebrated, not disregarded as manipulative or unnecessary.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 3:05pm - 3:25pm
038 Karpen Hall

3:05pm

Tourism Through the Lens of Historical Preservation in Asheville
This research attempts to connect Asheville's history to its modern day economy through the lens of historical preservation in the city. Examining Asheville's main economic contribution, tourism, through history shows the flourishing of the city Asheville and the adverse social effects on the local community. The articles rely on local historical professionals, archival data and research and focus on the importance of historical preservation on multiple levels in the community. A special focus is put on Seely’s Castle, a historical landmark shrouded in mystery and filled with architectural relevance in Asheville. Historical preservation not only contributes to saving a moment in time, but also helps Asheville’s thriving economy. The tourism in Asheville began in the early 1900s and continues to contribute to Asheville’s growing city. This growth, however, has pros and cons. While businesses grow and thrive in the tourist based economy, many locals become displaced and do not alway reap the benefits of tourism

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 3:05pm - 3:25pm
012 Karpen Hall

3:05pm

Summarizing Water Quality in Western North Carolina Using Biotic Indices
Various biotic indices are used as indicators in order to evaluate water quality. Impaired waters are waters in which quality samples for a defined parameter of that water body exceed water quality standards. The state of North Carolina uses two indices in their benthic macroinvertebrate water quality assessments: the biotic index (BI) and the Ephemeroptera Plecoptera Trichoptera (EPT) index. The state of North Carolina only samples a given location once every two years, on only a few sites. Therefore, it may have problems such as missing impaired sites or sampling a site on an atypical day. A volunteer benthic macroinvertebrate water sampling program, the Stream Monitoring Information Exchange (SMIE) samples more sites more frequently than the state. Because the state data and the SMIE data have some sampling sites in common, the main hypothesis of this study is to examine if combining the state data with the SMIE data would improve estimates of average biotic indices in western NC relative to estimates using only the state data. Using generalized linear models in SAS, trends and other factors that affect water quality are examined using the biotic indices of BI and EPT. Including factors such as site identification, sampling (state or SMIE), and year, it is found that incorporating the more frequently sampled SMIE data with the state analyses provides more precise results than the state data alone in order to summarize water quality in western NC.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 3:05pm - 3:25pm
123 Zeis Hall

3:05pm

The Headless Venus: A Study of Elihu Vedder’s Medusa Series
The predominate iconographic depiction of Medusa features her decapitated head affixed to the round shield of Athena or the severed head of Medusa held by Perseus. Her headless body is often not shown, and if shown, the body is depicted discarded at the feet of Perseus. American artist Elihu Vedder breaks from the traditional iconographical representations of Medusa by including and focusing on her nude, headless body in his illustrations, “Perseus and Medusa” (1875) and “The Dead Medusa” (1875). Furthermore, the pose reflects past and contemporaneous representations of Venus, the goddess of erotic love. Through the lens of feminist theory and Classical scholarship this paper will argue that the artist has transferred the desire for Medusa’s head to the desire for her body as exhibited by her sensual pose. The paper will contextualize Medusa within the social functions of mythology; these myths are cautionary tales that establish cultural norms. Likewise, Medusa symbolizes female sexuality and temptation in a patriarchal society, thus the male hero must vanquish her in order to maintain societal power dynamics. In these illustrations, Elihu Vedder inverts the power of the gaze from the agency of Medusa to that of the viewer’s objectification of her sexualized, defeated body. By removing the head, Vedder neutralizes the powerful gaze of Medusa, so the viewer can then safely look upon her body without Medusa looking back.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 3:05pm - 4:05pm
237 Owen Hall

3:20pm

Do Classroom Lessons About Poverty and Hands on Experiences with Healthy Low Cost Food Preparation Impact North Carolina Undergraduate Students’ Perceptions of Poverty?
Poverty and food insecurity are significant problems in North Carolina with 1 in 5, or 1.7 million North Carolinians living at or below the national poverty line. The purpose of this study was to better understand student’s’ perceptions of poverty and SNAP benefits at a small liberal arts college in Western North Carolina, and to assess student knowledge level before and after providing classroom and experiential education. Students in three nutrition classes (n=90) were given pre-and post-surveys addressing students’ personal understanding of national poverty income levels, amount of assistance the government provides, and student perceptions about poverty. A sub-group of students (n=16) participated in 1 of 2 cooking classes focused on healthy eating on a budget. The 2-hour cooking classes involved the preparation of one days’ worth of meals on a budget of $4 a day or less. The student cooking group completed a reflection assignment which indicates that 77% of the respondents reported an increase in cost awareness and interest in healthy low cost food preparation. Paired sample t-tests of pre-post survey questions revealed no statistically significant differences; however, when asked how likely low income individuals are to purchase nutritionally balanced meals, likelihood was higher in the post survey (mean of 2.06) than in the pre survey (mean of 1.63), which suggests that the experiential education may have influenced the students’ perceptions of poverty. Further research is needed to determine the positive effects, if any, of classroom and hands on lessons on poverty and healthy eating on a budget.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 3:20pm - 3:40pm
410 Wilma Sherrill Center

3:25pm

Visual Representation of Nationalism: Pan-Slavism through the Lens of Alphonse Mucha
Known as the originator of “Le Style Mucha” or Art Nouveau as deemed by the French, Alphonse Mucha's lesser known “The Slav Epic” reveals his passion and pride for Slav heritage. Mucha created a visual language through which people understand historical and political events, culminating in his desire to promote a pan-Slavic agenda. “The Slav Epic” received harsh criticism from the intelligentsia of the art world, having been created and finished during the Modernist art movement. This gave way to dialogue that considered the series obsolete and immature. In contrast, the general public found “The Slav Epic” moving, in the end facilitating imagined communities connecting people of Slav heritage. Through the examination of a selection of panels from the twenty in “The Slav Epic,” this thesis will analyze the events and symbols chosen by Alphonse Mucha to portray pan-Slavism.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 3:25pm - 3:45pm
237 Owen Hall

3:25pm

“Gawd Owns Them Woods”: The Intersectionality of Religion, Gender, and Class in Flannery O’Connor’s “A Circle in the Fire”
Flannery O’Connor wrote “A Circle in the Fire” in 1954, while living on her family farm in Milledgeville, Georgia. While many critics have focused on the biographical elements of her work, such as the rural settings and Christian faith, others argue that O’Connor was much more than a Roman Catholic apologist. It certainly seems so in “A Circle in the Fire,” in which the impoverished, orphaned son of a former hired hand returns to the rural estate of Mrs. Cope and her daughter Sally Virginia, bringing two other boys from Atlanta with him. Mrs. Cope attempts to handle the boys as she handles her black employees; she is motherly, but also condescending, exerting her moral and social superiority. The boys disobey her, claiming that the masculine presence of “Gawd” owns the property and Mrs. Cope. When they cause chaos, young Sally Virginia dresses like a man and goes to set them straight with her toy guns, but she fails to confront them. Expressing their desire to build a parking lot, the boys set the woods on fire. In the story’s conclusion, Sally Virginia compares the boys to the prophets from the Bible story of King Nebuchadnezzar, who save the king from worshipping a false idol. This thesis contends that the story’s conclusion reinforces the idea that Mrs. Cope has created a false sense of security for herself and Sally Virginia by running the rural estate. The boys intrude with harsh reality, which includes industrialism, male privilege, poverty, and revolutionary piety.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 3:25pm - 3:45pm
038 Karpen Hall

3:25pm

An Examination of the Academic and Social Success of Formerly Homeschooled Students at UNC Asheville
An Examination of the Academic and Social Success of Formerly Homeschooled Students at UNC Asheville is based on journalistic interviews conducted within the UNCA community. This creative project examines the individually-experienced transition from the often variable, independent education style of homeschooling to a highly-rated liberal arts university. It is a journalistic exploration into both subliminal and obtrusive perceptions and myths surrounding this category of non-traditional students. This presentation offers a sincere, sometimes comical, journalistic exploration of the stigma surrounding students who were homeschooled. Through interviews with faculty, parents and members of the general student body, the truth is revealed. Content includes: readily-admitted stereotypes and perceptions from professors and students, tales of embarrassing or frustrating encounters as a previously-homeschooled UNCA student, myth debunking, and plenty of photos.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 3:25pm - 3:45pm
012 Karpen Hall

3:40pm

A Collaborative Model for Sustainable Worksite Wellness in Small Businesses
Worksite wellness programs are becoming increasingly more popular and improving overall health, worksite productivity, and satisfaction among employees. While evidence of the benefits is mounting, a shortage of programs exists, especially in small businesses. Due to a smaller staff size, low funds, and ability to execute and assess programs, many small businesses are reluctant to adopt a worksite wellness program. The purpose of the current study was to develop and assess a worksite wellness program in a small business that partnered university faculty and students with a health promotion center. At a local non-profit association, a member of the NCCHW conducted a needs assessment and worked with policy-makers at the non-profit to implement health promotion policies. In addition, a team of Health and Wellness faculty and students conducted pre-assessments on health-related factors (Including height, weight, trunk flexibility, three minute step-tests, blood pressure, grip strength, and body fat percentage from a Tanita scale) on 43 employees showing the majority of employees in the moderate risk category. All employees enrolled in the intervention received a Pepple Fitkik activity tracker and information sessions on chronic disease management. Participants at moderate risk for CHD received one meeting with a health coach, while participants at high risk were offered four meetings with a health coach and a medical counseling session with Pharmacy department staff. A 3-month follow-up analysis will be conducted in April to determine the efficacy of the program. Employees will be asked to complete surveys based their feelings about the program, as well as repeat of all health assessments completed at baseline. Results on these measures will be available in May. If successful, this program can be tailored to other small businesses in Western North Carolina to improve employee heath and satisfaction.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 3:40pm - 4:00pm
410 Wilma Sherrill Center

3:45pm

Searching for Middle Ground: Connecting the East and the West through Universal Themes in The Kite Runner
Afghanistan’s reputation in the West, particularly following the events of September 11, 2001 and America’s “War on Terror,” has been marked by an ideology that reduces conflict in the region down to the idea of “Us” vs. “Them.” Media portrayals of the Middle East often show incessant images of violence, war, and destruction that support this pervasive idea. Juxtaposed with these perspectives comes Afghan-American Khaled Hosseini’s novel, The Kite Runner, which gives voice to a narrative that is neither exclusively “Us” nor “Them,” but rather a middle ground. The Kite Runner intertwines the familiar and the foreign, allowing readers to both identify with universal themes while also grappling with the nuances of a society that may be largely different than their own. In my thesis I argue that it is these universal themes that are crucial to deconstructing stereotypes about Afghanistan, terrorism, and Islam. In my analysis, I will discuss the vastly different perceptions educators and literary critics have about The Kite Runner and challenge arguments that claim the novel does more harm than good. I emphasize the importance of contemporary literature like The Kite Runner in working to create a better world, despite the limitations in approaches to world literature.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 3:45pm - 4:05pm
038 Karpen Hall

4:00pm

Did You Find Your Pot of Gold Today?
Americans of many generations and social economic status are dealing with an obesity problem that now starts in childhood. According to the American Heart Association, the current generation of children is predicted to live a shorter lifespan than their parents due to obesity. Most programs available to address this problem are for adults and mine is for children. My plan addresses from the point of view that eating fresh fruits and vegetables give children the energy needed to do the things they want to do and makes doing so fun.  My plan focuses on early elementary school children but can be adapted to children of all ages.  I start with the question “Did you find your pot of gold today?” followed by a story of child’s walk with its grandmother to find the end of the rainbow, meeting growers and sellers of fresh fruits and vegetables along the way.  The children who comprise the audience are also participants during the story telling.  After the story telling there is an exercise which the children take home so their family is also exposed to the plan.  A follow up in the classroom one week later asks how many days the children ate a colorful array of fruits and vegetables. Promise for use of this strategy will be discussed.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 4:00pm - 4:20pm
410 Wilma Sherrill Center

4:00pm

Fib
A screening of fib a feature-length film combining three short films about lies, big and small. Written and produced by Mass Communication, New Media and Drama students for a Mass Communication senior capstone course.*Featuring explosions, robots, time travel, Megan Fox and more.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 4:00pm - 5:00pm
012 Karpen Hall

4:05pm

“The Knot Loops in upon Itself”: Futility in Language, Communication, and Meaning in J. M. Coetzee’s Waiting for the Barbarians
South African novelist J. M. Coetzee’s 1980 novel Waiting for the Barbarians explores how systems of oppression work to destroy language, impede communication, and divert meaning from lived experiences. Focalized through the experience of a rural township’s Magistrate, the novel largely deals with acts of oppression inflicted upon a group of barbarians who are given no voice and little agency. After he establishes a physical relationship with an unnamed barbarian woman, the Magistrate becomes obsessed with reconciling his position in the unidentified Empire with that of the barbarian experience. He fails at this reconciliation for three reasons: the failure of language to express horrific bodily pain, the disconnect between the physical body and meaning, and Coetzee’s own hesitancy as an author to impose a single interpretation. This thesis explores these “failures” by examining both verbal and nonverbal forms of language and communication in the novel. Many aspects of the text, including torture, spoken language, and historiography, perpetuate the oppression of the barbarian people but fail to allow an easy interpretation or signify a conclusive meaning. In fact, a singular meaning in the text proves elusive for both the Magistrate and readers. Political and historical implications aside, Waiting for the Barbarians challenges readers to accept the pitfalls of language and communication and thus, the evasive and complex presence of meaning.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 4:05pm - 4:25pm
038 Karpen Hall

4:20pm

A Critical Analysis of the Paleolithic Diet
One recent diet to come to public attention is known as the Paleolithic diet , which essentially prescribes that we need to regain our connection with the eating patterns of the Paleolithic era, roughly between 2.6 million and 10,000 years ago. The logic behind the Paleo diet states that since this period our eating habits have developed so rapidly that our bodies haven’t been able to keep up evolutionarily. In other words, humans are biologically designed to eat a certain way and the disparity between this and the way modern humans eat happens at the expense of our health. Though this sounds logical, it makes several assumptions that aren’t necessarily true. It assumes that human genetics haven’t changed significantly since Paleolithic times, that humans didn’t eat certain foods before the agricultural revolution, and that hunter-gatherer diets can be reduced down to one category. For these among other reasons the Paleo diet has some fundamental flaws.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 4:20pm - 4:40pm
410 Wilma Sherrill Center

4:25pm

“I have had my vision:” Balancing Subjective and Objective Views of Reality in To the Lighthouse
Virginia Woolf’s innovative writing style is one of the many reasons she is considered one of the most significant modernist writers of the twentieth century. She breaks with writing conventions, from the Victorian era in particular, that preceded her. In “Modern Fiction,” Woolf makes clear that these depictions may have been about life but were not of life. As a response, her writing encourages originality by depicting life as she thought it should be experienced, “not [as] a series of gig lamps symmetrically arranged” but as a “luminous halo” (160) . In her 1927 novel, To the Lighthouse, she presents two characters, Mr. and Mrs. Ramsay, who illustrate objective and subjective views of life respectively. Mr. Ramsay, for example, is too preoccupied with the longevity of his work and experiences life factually, “what he said was true. It was always true. He was incapable of untruth,” while Mrs. Ramsay views life in a much more fluid and emotional way, as evidenced by Woolf’s comparisons to open windows (4). With these two characters, Woolf illustrates the disabling effect of dwelling too heavily on either end of each opposing force. Another central character, Lily Briscoe, may be read as a combination of both views of reality. Although she struggles to capture reality in a portrait of Mrs. Ramsay that she works on as the novel progresses, she eventually finds a kind of middle-of-the-ground approach between the two views and has ultimately “had [her] vision” (209). This thesis considers how Briscoe’s combined approach typifies the possibility of experiencing and living a more balanced, harmonious life.

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Wednesday April 22, 2015 4:25pm - 4:45pm
038 Karpen Hall

4:40pm

Mindful in the Middle
Mindfulness and contemplative practices have been growing in popularity as educators look for new and engaging ways to provide much-needed social and emotional education for students. Studies show that mindfulness practices can lead to decreases in stress and anxiety, improvements in focus and concentration, and overall increases in self-awareness and emotional stability. The Mindful in the Middle Project was designed to bring the growing field of mindfulness in education to Asheville Middle School in the form of week-long slacklining and mindful eating interventions led by UNCA students during health and PE classes. The project is currently in the second round of intervention and has reached over 450 6th, 7th, and 8th grade students (2/3 of the student population).  When asked how familiar they are with the concept of mindfulness before and after the first round of intervention, the percentage of students who reported that they know a little or lot about mindfulness increased from 61% to 83%. Our hope is that familiarity with mindfulness will lead to greater self-awareness and to tangible benefits that can be observed in and outside the classroom


Wednesday April 22, 2015 4:40pm - 5:00pm
410 Wilma Sherrill Center

7:30pm

A Farewell to Arms
This play is an adaptation of Ernest Hemingway’s World War I novel, A Farewell to Arms. It tells the story of an American ambulance driver, Frederic, and his relationship with an English nurse, Catherine. A second story not included in the novel will tell of a parallel homosexual romance between an Italian soldier in Frederic’s company, named Gino, and a priest attached to the company. The play will be performed in the Carol Belk Theatre. The performance dates are Wednesday, April 22 through Satuday, April 25 at 7:30pm.


Wednesday April 22, 2015 7:30pm - 9:30pm
Carol Belk Theatre